Video: Delivering for Large-Scale Events

From event to event it’s not a surprise that streaming traffic increases, but this look at the Wolrd Cup 2018 shows a very sharp rise beating many expecatations. Joachim Hengge tells us what hte World Cup looked like from Akamai’s perspective.

Joachim takes us through the stats for streaming the World Cup where they peaked at 23Tbps of throuhgput with nearly 10 million concurrent viewers. The bandwidth was significantly higher than the last World Cup but looking at the data, we can learn a few more things about the market.

After looking at a macth-by-match breakdown we look at a sytsem architecture for one customer who delivered the World Cup to highlight the importance of stable content ingest, latency and broadcast quality. Encoding and packaging into HLS with 4-second chunks were tasks done on site with the rest happening within Akamai and being fed to other CDNs. Joachim pulls this together into three key recommendations for anyone looking at streaming large events before delvingin to some Sweden-specific streaming stats where over 81% of feeds were played back at the highest quality.

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Free registration required

This talk is from Streaming Tech Sweden, an annual conference run by Eyevinn Technology. Videos from the event are available to paid attendees but are released free of charge after several months. As with all videos on The Broadcast Knowledge, this is available free of charge after registering on the site.

Speaker

Joachim Hengge Joachim Hengge
Senior Product Manager, Media Services,
Akamai

Video: User-Generated HDR is Still Too Hard

HDR and wide colour gamuts are difficult enough in professional settings – how can YouTube get it right with user-generated content?

Steven Robertson from Google explains the difficulties that YouTube has faced in dealing with HDR in both its original productions but also in terms of user generated content (UGC). These difficulties stem from the Dolby PQ way of looking at the world with fixed brightnesses and the ability to go all the way up to 10,000 nits of brightness and also from the world of wider colour gamuts with Display P3 and BT.2020 (WCG).

Viewing conditions have been a challenge right from the beginning of TV but ever more so now with screens of many different shapes and sizes being available with very varied abilities to show brightness and colour. Steven spends some time discussing the difficulty of finding a display suitable for colour grading and previewing your work on – particularly for individual users who are without a large production budget.

Interestingly, we then see that one of the biggest difficulties is in visual perception which makes colours you see after having seen bad colours look much better. HDR can deliver extremely bright and extremely wrong colours. Steven shows real examples from YouTube of where the brain has been tricked into thinking colour and brightness are correct but they clearly are not.

Whilst it’s long been known that HDR and WCG are inextricably linked with human vision, this is a great insight into tackling this at scale and the research that has gone on to bring this under automated control.

Watch now!
Free registration required

This talk is from Streaming Tech Sweden, an annual conference run by Eyevinn Technology. Videos from the event are available to paid attendees but are released free of charge after several months. As with all videos on The Broadcast Knowledge, this is available free of charge after registering on the site.

Speaker

Steven Robertson Steven Robertson
Software Engineer, YouTube Player Infrastructure
Google

Video: Blockchain-based Distributed Transcoding Model

It’s all very well talking about ‘blockchain’ but where’s the use case? This working transcoding and distribution platform is one example and LivePeer’s Philipp Angele steps onto the stage to explain how they have created this platform as a service using the under-utilised video encoding capability of GPUs used in crypto currency mining.

Whilst there is a lot of hype around blockchain, the fact remains that many blockchains are in constant use throughout the world and, unrelated to any currency aspect, they have a robust way of solving certain problems – the main one being ensuring exchanges of data are completed fairly and without any fraud. This can be applied to distribution of content as much as it can be to ‘smart contracts’ which, Philipp explains are like legal contracts in as much as they are a promise to do certain things. They are ‘smart’, because the blockchain network can verify that the contract has been completed.

Livepeer’s open source platform on which developers can build services works, we hear, by brokering interactions between ‘broadcasters’, ‘orchestrators’ and ‘transcoders’. Philipp details how these work together and also looks at the incentives miners have to participate by analysing their profits for different tasks.

To finish off, this talk then takes focusses on the other elements of online streaming services and examines what services are available to accomplish those tasks using distributed/blockchain technology.

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Free registration required
This talk was given at Streaming Tech Sweden which is an annual conference from Eyvinn Technology. Streamed on their own video platform, talks are initially available exclusively to all conference attendees, but are released free-to-view during the subsequent year. Free registration is required to watch the videos.

Speaker

Phillip Angele Phillip Angele
Head of Product,
Livepeer

Video: How Video is Affected by Human Physiology

How can we make video more appealing to humans? We’ve evolved to live a certain way and this has defined – and will continue to define – our video technologies. MUX founder Jon Dahl talks to us here about the ways in which human physiology drives viewing habits.

Vertical vs. horizontal video, angular resolution and how the typical viewing distances of computers, TVs and other devices affects what resolution we can perceive are all discussed. Jon moves on to frequencies both of audio and video where frame rates and flicker are important and where physics comes into play alongside biology.

Even for the experienced, this talk is bound to bring something new and is a great tour of the fundamentals of the visual perception that our industry relies on and strives to please day in, day out.

Watch now!
Free registration required

This talk was given at Streaming Tech Sweden which is an annual conference from Eyvinn Technology. Streamed on their own video platform, talks are initially available exclusively to all conference attendees, but are released free-to-view during the subsequent year. Free registration is required to watch the videos.

Speaker

John Dahl John Dahl
Founder,
MUX