Video: Monetization with Manifest Manipulation

Manipulating the manifest of streamed video allows localisation of adverts with the option of per-client customisation. This results in better monetisation but also a better way to deal with blackouts and other regulatory or legal restrictions.

Using the fact that most streamed video is delivered by using a playlist which is simply a text file which lists the locations of the many files which contain the video, we see that you could deliver different playlists to clients in different locations – detected via geolocating the IP address. Similarly different ads can be delivered depending on the type of client requesting – phone, tablet, computer etc.

Here, Imagine’s Yuval Fisher starts by reminding us how online streaming typically works using HLS as an example. He then leads us through the possibilities of manifest manipulation. One interesting idea is using this to remove hardware delivering cost savings using the same infrastructure to deliver to both the internet and broadcast. Yuval finshes up with a list of “Dos and Don’ts” to explain the best way to achieve the playlist manipulation.

Sarah Foss rounds off the presentation explaining how manifest manipulation sits at the centre of the rest of the ad-delivery system.

Watch now!

Speaker

Yuval Fisher Yuval Fisher
CTO, Distribution
Imagine Communications.
Sarah Foss Sarah Foss
Former SVP & GM, Ad Tech,
Imagine Communications.

Video: Adaptive Bitrate Algorithms: How They Work

Streaming on the net relies on delivering video at a bandwidth you can handle. Called ‘Adaptive Bitrate’ or ABR, it’s hardly possible to think of streaming without it. While the idea might seem simple initially – just send several versions of your video – it quickly gets nuanced.

Streaming experts Streamroot take us through how ABR works at Streaming Media East from 2016. While the talk is a few years old, the facts are still the same so this remains a useful talk which not only introduces the topic but goes into detail on how to implement ABR.

The most common streaming format is HLS which relies on the player downloading the video in sections – small files – each representing around 3 to 10 seconds of video. For HLS and similar technologies, the idea is simply to allow the player, when it’s time to download the next part of the video, to choose from a selection of files each with the same video content but each at a different bitrate.

Allowing a player to choose which chunk it downloads means it can adapt to changing network conditions but does imply that each file has contain exactly the same frames of video else there would be a jump when the next file is played. So we have met our first complication. Furthermore, each encoded stream needs to be segmented in the same way and in MPEG, where you can only cut files on I-frame boundaries, it means the encoders need to synchronise their GOP structure giving us our second complication.

These difficulties, many more and Streamroot’s solutions are presented by Erica Beavers and Nikolay Rodionov including experiments and proofs of concept they have carried out to demonstrate the efficacy.

Watch now!

Speakers

Erica Beavers Erica Beavers
Head of Marketing & Partnerships,
Streamroot
Nikolay Rodionov Nikolay Rodionov
Co-Founder, CPO
Streamroot

Video: CHUNKY MONKEY – using chunked-encoded chunked-transferred CMAF to bring low latency live to very large scale audiences

Will Law from Akamai proves his chunky credentials by telling us how to achive very low-latency streaming in his talk at Demuxed 2018.

In the jungle of solutions for low latency live streaming, there are many current options ranging from WebRTC, to proprietary UDP protocols to standard segmented media with ever-shortening segments. This session highlights one of these – chunked-encoded chunked-transferred CMAF – as a optimal and practical confluence of both reach and performance. On the technical side we’ll investigate the underlying technology, the latency regimes possible, compatibility with legacy players, cachability on delivery networks and player behavior requirements. Including live demonstrations of several streams on a production network. This talks brings a standards perspective from DVB and DASH as well as CDN support. As a sweetener, Will points you at open source code on both the encoder and player side for doing this all yourself.

Speaker:

Will Law Will Law
Chief Architect, Media Cloud Engineering
Akamai Technologies

Webinar: Foundational Concepts: Video Compression, Processing and Delivery


On demand webinar from AWS Elemental covering some streaming basics.

In this webcast, you will:
• Learn how to create and deliver video over the internet
• Understand video codecs, containers, popular delivery methods and content delivery networks
• Consider methods, including adaptive bitrate streaming, that enable high-quality video to be delivered to a wide range of internet-connected devices
• Learn about the latest trends in video compression and delivery

Increasing smartphone subscriptions and data volumes per subscription are driving rapid growth in mobile data traffic, much of which is video content. According to multiple industry reports, these trends will continue for the near future, and by 2020, 75 percent of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video according to the Cisco Visual Networking Index. Technical and business leaders at organizations that aim to expand offerings using video need to understand the complexities of delivering premium viewing experiences to consumers.

Watch now!

Webinar: Online Video Formats: 2018 and Beyond


Webinar: Tue, Mar 27, 2018 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM BST
Sifting through the plethora of online codecs current and upcoming, Jason Thibeault and Thierry Fautier present this webinar from Harmonic and the Streaming Video Alliance

Recently, we have seen renewed attention on HEVC following Apple’s announcement to support the codec on their devices. 6 months later, Apple surprisingly became a founding member of the Alliance for Open Media (AOM) as a supporter of the AV1 codec. Yet, while the AOM group claims AV1 provides better performance than HEVC and will be offered royalty-free, there are some academic benchmarks who find AV1 inferior to HEVC on codec quality and performance.
In the meantime, MPEG / ITU-T is working on a next generation video codec, in a group called JVET (Joint Video Exploration Team) that has a mandate to deliver a video compression standard that can reach 50% over HEVC in 2020. Additionally, on the streaming side, we have seen the MPEG CMAF standard getting some traction not only to unify the HLS and DASH worlds, but also to offer the long awaited low latency delay solution for OTT.

This panel will discuss perspectives on these video compression technologies to help content providers, broadcasters, and service providers figure out the best path forward to distribute content over the internet in the coming years.

Register now!

Webinar: Overcoming the Latency Hurdle in Delivering Streaming Video


Webinar: Thursday, December 7 – 11:00am PT / 2:00pm ET / 19:00 GMT

Keith Weinberger from Limelight with colleague Charles Kraus discuss latency. As viewers spend more time online watching live and on-demand video content, broadcasters and content distributors are under increasing pressure to deliver an exceptional low-latency live video streaming and on-demand experience, on any device.

Join the video delivery experts from Limelight Networks when they share strategies for implementing a cost-effective solution at global scale, without sacrificing the quality your audiences expect. They will also discuss how to:

  • Deliver live video at 3 to 5 second latencies through HLS and DASH chunked streaming techniques or sub-second latencies through emerging WebRTC technology
  • Reach the widest possible audience with multi-device streaming
  • Optimize all points in your video workflow to ensure broadcast-quality experiences

REGISTER NOW for Overcoming the Latency Hurdle in Delivering Streaming Video.

Webinar: DASH—New Advancements in DASH Media Delivery


Webinar: WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2017 – 11:00AM PT / 2:00PM ET / 19:00 BST
In this webinar, we will present the latest MPEG and DASH-IF advancements on DASH. We will cover new additional standard tools for OTT, DASH support for VR/360° video delivery, low-latency DASH streaming, DRM, and the DASH-IF guidelines for streaming UHD/HDR content.
Register