Video: How IP is Revolutionising Sports Video Production

IP Production is very important for sports streaming including esports where its flexibility is a big plus over SDI infrastructure. This panel discusses NDI, SMPTE ST 2110

eSports, in particular, uses many cameras, Point-of-video cameras, PC outputs and the normal camera positions needed to make a good show, so a technology like NDI really helps keeps costs down – since every SDI port is expensive and takes space – plus it allows computer devices to ‘natively’ send video without specific hardware.

NDI is an IP specification from Newtek (now owned by VizRT) which can be licenced for free and is included in Ross, VizRT, Panasonic, OBS, Epiphan and hundreds more. It allows ultra-low-latency video at 100Mbps or low-latency video at 8Mbps.

The panel discusses the right place and use for NDI compared to SDI. In the right places, networking is more convenient as in stadia. And if you have a short distance to run, SDI can often be the best plan. Similarly, until NDI version 4 which includes timing synchronisation, ST 2110 has been a better bet in terms of synchronised video for ISO recordings.

For many events which combine many cameras with computer outputs, whether it be computers playing youtube, Skype or something else, removing the need to convert to SDI allows the production to be much more flexible.

The panel finishes by discussing audio, and taking questions from the floor covering issues such as embedded alpha, further ST 2110 considerations and UHD workflows.

Watch now!
Speakers

Philip Nelson Philip Nelson
President,
Nelco Media
Mark East Mark East
Chief Problem Solver,
090 Media
Victor Borachuk Victor Borachuk
Director/Executive Producer
JupiterReturn
Jack Lave Jack Lavey
Operations Technician,
FloSports
Jon Raidel Jon Raidel
Technical Operations Manager,
NFL Networks

Video: IP For Media Webcast Part II

Following on from last week’s post part II is here. Wes Simpson looks at use of IP in Remote Production/Remote Integration (REMI) and finished with a panel discussion including Newtek and Grass Valley, a Belden brand.

This video talks about:

  • Why Broadcasters need networking?
  • Typical Live remote sports broadcast roles
  • Overview of video & audio Signal types
  • HDR & Wide Colour Gamut (WCG)
  • Data (metadata, scripts etc)
  • REMI – Remote Integration, AKA ‘Remote Production’ in Europe.
  • Overview of what tasks can be done at base, what still needs to be done ‘on-site’
  • Uncompressed formats summary (SDI, 2022-6, 2110)
  • Slice-based compression
  • Mezzanine compression
  • TR-01 for carrying JPEG 2000 & audio
  • Bonded Cellular
  • Packetloss & FEC (Forward Error Correction)
  • 2022-7 – route diversity
  • Typical delays
  • Plus a panel discussion

 
Watch now!

Speakers

Wes Simpson Wes Simpson
President,
Telecom Product Consulting
Tom Butts Tom Butts
Content Director,
TV Technology

Webinar: Neuron – IP Signal Processing for Broadcast Infrastructures


Date: Wednesday October 3rd, 08:00 BST and 16:00 BST
At IBC, Axon introduced, to much fanfare, “the world’s first Network Attached Processor” and announced two customers to boot. But what is a Network Attached Processor? Why will this solve signal processing needs of IP and hybrid-IP environments?

Peter Schut, CTO of Axon, will explain and answer questions in two sessions, am and pm.

Register now!

Video: Control Throughput and Latency for Multicast-based IP Routing Systems

John Mailhot explains throughput and latency in switches and discusses live SDI switching in IP, subscription and control using NMOS 5 and 6. John then takes some time to discuss what ‘good enough’ is for switching time given SDI also has a delay.

Finishing up with network topology and interoperability, this is a great look into some of the details of dealing with 2110.

The SMPTE 2110 family of essence networking protocols is based on multicast flows in the IP network. IGMP (Internet Group Multicast Protocol) is the typical method for endpoints to subscribe to the streams they want, and to leave the streams they no longer require. Concerns have been raised in the industry about the suitability of IGMP for this task, and the applicability of SDN techniques as an alternative means to managing group memberships. Speed of switching signals is a particular concern.

Watch Now!