Video: ATSC 3.0

“OTT over the air” – ATSC 3.0 deployment has started in the US and has been deployed in Korea. Promising to bring interactivity and ‘internet-style’ services to broadcast TV, moreover allowing ‘TV’ to transition to mobile devices. To help understand what ATSC 3.0 enables, NABShow Live brings together Sinclair’s Mark Aitken, Bill Hayes from Iowa Public Television and SMPTE’s Thomas Bause Mason all of which are deeply involved in the development of ATSC 3.0.

The panelists dive in to what ATSC 1 was and how we get to 3.0, outlining the big things that have changed. One key thing is that broadcasters can now choose how robust the stream is, balanced against bandwidth. Not only that but multiple streams with different robustnesses are possible for the same channel. This allows ATSC 3.0 to be tailored to your market and support different business models.

ATSC 3.0, as Bill Hayes says was ‘built to evolve’ and to deal with new standards as they come along and was at pains to point out that all these advancements came without any extra spectrum allocations. Thomas outlined that not only is SMPTE on the board of ATSC, but the broadcast standards upstream of distribution now need to work and communicate with downstream. HDR, for instance, needs metadata and the movement of that is one of the standards SMPTE has formed. As Mark Aitken says ‘the lines are blurring’ with devices at the beginning of the end of the chain both being responsible for correct results on the TV.

The session ends by asking what the response has been from broadcasters. Are they embracing the standard? After all, they are not obliged to use ATSC 3.0.
Thomas say that interest has picked up and that large and small networks are now showing more interest with 50 broadcasters already having committed to it.

Watch now!
Speakers

Thomas Bause Mason Thomas Bause Mason
Director Standards Development,
SMPTE
Bill Hayes Bill Hayes
Director of Engineering & Technology
Iowa Public Television
Mark Aitken Mark Aitken
SVP of Advanced Technology,
Sinclair Broadcast Group
Linda Rosner Linda Rosner
Managing Director,
Artisans PR

Video: How IP is Revolutionising Sports Video Production

IP Production is very important for sports streaming including esports where its flexibility is a big plus over SDI infrastructure. This panel discusses NDI, SMPTE ST 2110

eSports, in particular, uses many cameras, Point-of-video cameras, PC outputs and the normal camera positions needed to make a good show, so a technology like NDI really helps keeps costs down – since every SDI port is expensive and takes space – plus it allows computer devices to ‘natively’ send video without specific hardware.

NDI is an IP specification from Newtek (now owned by VizRT) which can be licenced for free and is included in Ross, VizRT, Panasonic, OBS, Epiphan and hundreds more. It allows ultra-low-latency video at 100Mbps or low-latency video at 8Mbps.

The panel discusses the right place and use for NDI compared to SDI. In the right places, networking is more convenient as in stadia. And if you have a short distance to run, SDI can often be the best plan. Similarly, until NDI version 4 which includes timing synchronisation, ST 2110 has been a better bet in terms of synchronised video for ISO recordings.

For many events which combine many cameras with computer outputs, whether it be computers playing youtube, Skype or something else, removing the need to convert to SDI allows the production to be much more flexible.

The panel finishes by discussing audio, and taking questions from the floor covering issues such as embedded alpha, further ST 2110 considerations and UHD workflows.

Watch now!
Speakers

Philip Nelson Philip Nelson
President,
Nelco Media
Mark East Mark East
Chief Problem Solver,
090 Media
Victor Borachuk Victor Borachuk
Director/Executive Producer
JupiterReturn
Jack Lave Jack Lavey
Operations Technician,
FloSports
Jon Raidel Jon Raidel
Technical Operations Manager,
NFL Networks

Video: IP For Media Webcast Part II

Following on from last week’s post part II is here. Wes Simpson looks at use of IP in Remote Production/Remote Integration (REMI) and finished with a panel discussion including Newtek and Grass Valley, a Belden brand.

This video talks about:

  • Why Broadcasters need networking?
  • Typical Live remote sports broadcast roles
  • Overview of video & audio Signal types
  • HDR & Wide Colour Gamut (WCG)
  • Data (metadata, scripts etc)
  • REMI – Remote Integration, AKA ‘Remote Production’ in Europe.
  • Overview of what tasks can be done at base, what still needs to be done ‘on-site’
  • Uncompressed formats summary (SDI, 2022-6, 2110)
  • Slice-based compression
  • Mezzanine compression
  • TR-01 for carrying JPEG 2000 & audio
  • Bonded Cellular
  • Packetloss & FEC (Forward Error Correction)
  • 2022-7 – route diversity
  • Typical delays
  • Plus a panel discussion

 
Watch now!

Speakers

Wes Simpson Wes Simpson
President,
Telecom Product Consulting
Tom Butts Tom Butts
Content Director,
TV Technology

Webinar: Neuron – IP Signal Processing for Broadcast Infrastructures


Date: Wednesday October 3rd, 08:00 BST and 16:00 BST
At IBC, Axon introduced, to much fanfare, “the world’s first Network Attached Processor” and announced two customers to boot. But what is a Network Attached Processor? Why will this solve signal processing needs of IP and hybrid-IP environments?

Peter Schut, CTO of Axon, will explain and answer questions in two sessions, am and pm.

Register now!