Video: How speakers and sound systems work: Fundamentals, plus Broadcast and Cinema Implementations

Many of us know how speakers work, but when it comes to phased arrays or object audio we’re losing our footing. Wherever you are in the spectrum, this dive into speakers and sound systems will be beneficial.

Ken Hunold from Dolby Laboratories starts this talk with a short history of sound in both film and TV unveiling the surprising facts that film reverted from stereo back to mono around the 1950s and TV stayed mono right up until the 80s. We follow this history up to now with the latest immersive sound systems and multi-channel sound in broadcasting.

Whilst the basics of speakers are fairly widely known, Ken with looking at how that’s set up and the different shapes and versions of basic speakers and their enclosures then looking at column speakers and line arrays.

Multichannel home audio continues to offer many options for speaker positioning and speaker type including bouncing audio off the ceilings, so Ken explores these options and compares them including the relatively recent sound bars.

Cinema sound has always been critical to the effect of cinema and foundational to the motivation for people to come together and watch films away from their TVs. There have long been many speakers in cinemas and Ken charts how this has changed as immersive audio has arrived and enabled an illusion of infinite speakers with sound all around.

In the live entertainment space, sound, again, is different where the scale is often much bigger and the acoustics so much different. Ken talks about the challenges of delivering sound to so many people, keeping the sound even throughout the auditorium and dealing with delay of the relatively slow-moving sound waves. The talk wraps up with questions and answers.

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Speakers

Ken Hunold Ken Hunold
Sr. Broadcast Services Manager, Customer Engineering
Dolby Laboratories, Inc.

Video: Intro to 4K Video & HDR

With all the talk of IP, you’d be wrong to think SDI is dead. 12G for 4K is alive and well in many places, so there’s plenty of appetite to understand how it works and how to diagnose problems.

In this double-header, Steve Holmes from Tektronix takes us through the ins and outs of HDR and also SDI for HDR at the SMPTE SF section.

Steve starts with his eye on the SMPTE standards for UHD SDI video looking at video resolutions and seeing that a UHD picture can be made up of 4 HD pictures which gives rise to two well known formats ‘Quad split’ and ‘2SI’ (2 Sample Interleave).

Colour is the next focus and a discussion on the different colour spaces that UHD is delivered with (spoiler: they’re all in use), what these look like on the vector scope and look at the different primaries. Finishing up with a roundup and a look at interlink timing, there’s a short break before hitting the next topic…HDR

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High Dynamic Range is an important technology which is still gaining adoption and is often provided in 4K programmes. Steve defines the two places HDR is important; in the acquisition and the display of the video then provides a handy lookup table of terms such as HDR, WCG, PQ, HDR10, DMCVT and more.

Steve gives us a primer on what HDR is in terms of brightness ‘NITS’, how these relate to real life and how we talk about it with respect to the displays. We then look at HDR on the waveform monitor and look at features of waveform monitors which allow engineers to visualise and check HDR such as false colour.

The topic of gamma, EOTFs and colour spaces comes up next and is well explained building on what came earlier. Before the final demo and Q&A, Steve talks about different ways to grade pictures when working in HDR.

A great intro to the topics at hand – just like Steve’s last one: Uncompressed Video over IP & PTP Timing

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Speakers

Steve Holmes Steve Holmes
Senior Applications Engineer,
Tektronix

Video: How Video is Affected by Human Physiology

How can we make video more appealing to humans? We’ve evolved to live a certain way and this has defined – and will continue to define – our video technologies. MUX founder Jon Dahl talks to us here about the ways in which human physiology drives viewing habits.

Vertical vs. horizontal video, angular resolution and how the typical viewing distances of computers, TVs and other devices affects what resolution we can perceive are all discussed. Jon moves on to frequencies both of audio and video where frame rates and flicker are important and where physics comes into play alongside biology.

Even for the experienced, this talk is bound to bring something new and is a great tour of the fundamentals of the visual perception that our industry relies on and strives to please day in, day out.

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Free registration required

This talk was given at Streaming Tech Sweden which is an annual conference from Eyvinn Technology. Streamed on their own video platform, talks are initially available exclusively to all conference attendees, but are released free-to-view during the subsequent year. Free registration is required to watch the videos.

Speaker

John Dahl John Dahl
Founder,
MUX

Video: AWS Networking Fundamentals

Networking in the cloud, by rights, should be the same in your office but with it’s a lot easier when you’re led through it. From subnets to VPN’s, this talk from AWS makes sure you can get your VPC (Virtual Private Cloud) talking to other parts of your cloud infrastructure and your office.

Starting with the basics and building up, Perry and Tom take us through the IP address allocation, address choices, firewall configuration, security configuration and then on to Direct Connect, VPNs sharing VPC resources and much more.

From the AWS Summit 2019, this is a great talk for those who know networking well and are new to AWS, as well as those who are comfortable with AWS names, but are a little rusty on the finer points of networking.

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Speakers

Perry Wald Perry Wald
Enterprise Solutions Architect,
AWS
Tom Adamski Tom Adamski
Specialist Solutions Architect,
AWS