Webinar: DVB-I service discovery and programme metadata

DVB-I is an initiative to develop technical standards for television to be delivered over IP, whether over-the-top or over the internet. DVB-I works with DVB-T (terrestrial), DVB-S (satellite) and DVB-C (cable) broadcast standards so accessing services feels the same whichever delivery channel is used.

DVB-I makes the best use of the different capabilities of each channel:
– People who don’t have broadcast television can still receive services
– Devices that don’t include DVB tuners can still receive services
– New services are possible which wouldn’t be possible on conventional broadcast platforms

There are many separate ways of achieving a hybrid of OTT-delivered and broadcast-delivered content, but they are not necessarily interoperable. DVB aims to solve the interoperability issue, along with the problem of service discovery with DVB-I. As the internet is global, also DVB-I will allow global distribution of programming, whilst still honouring licensing agreements and regulatory requirements.

This webinar from DVB will cover what DVB-I is, the key use cases, it’s current status and the future timeline. The webinar will also look at service discovery, service lists and end by discussing programme metadata.

You can look at the current approved DVB-I standard here.

No need to register! Just go to the link after 12:45 GMT on Wednesday 4th December.

Watch Webinar

Speakers

Peter Lanigan Peter Lanigan
Chair of the Commercial Module subgroup CM-I,
DVB
Paul Higgs Paul Higgs
Co-chair of the Technical Module subgroup TM-IPI and leader of the DVB-I Task Force
DVB

Video: HbbTV and ATSC 3.0 sees broadcasters striking back

Should HbbTV and ATSC 3.0 be seen as the last flailing attempts for over-the-air broadcasters to remain relevant, or an important step forward in terms of keeping in step with changing viewership? Both technologies enable traditional broadcast to be mixed with internet-based video, entertainment and services as part of one, seamless, experience.

ATSC 3.0 has taken hold in the US and some other countries as a way to deliver digital video within a single traditional VHF channel – and with the latest 3.0 version, this actually moves to broadcasting IP packets over the air. HbbTV, on the other hand, is more commonly found in Europe and Asia with deployments in nearly 40 countries.

ATSC 3.0 is ready for deployment in the US and is now at a turning poin. With a number of successful trials under its belt, it’s now time for the real deployments to start. In this panel discussion as part of the IBC 2019 conference we hear that CES 2020 will be the time to listen out for major ATSC announcements.

The approach to digital TV in most other places, through DVB, is to bring together many broadcasters in to one multiplexed signal. In the initial iterations of DVB-T, broadcasters have banded together under the same name: In the UK and Australia, for instance, it’s ‘Freeview’. So when moving to something like HbbTV, in contrast to the ATSC plan, it’s natural to do the same.

This panel brings together companies who are pushing the technologies forward from the Europe and the US.

Watch now!

Speakers

Mary Ann Halford Mary Ann Halford
Senior Advisor,
OC & C Strategy Consultants
Richard M. Friedel Richard M. Friedel
Executive Vice President, Technology & Broadcast Strategy,
21st Century Fox
Anne Schelle Anne Schelle
Managing Director,
Pearl
Vincent Grivet Vincent Grivet
Chairman,
HbbTV Association
Oliver Botti Oliver Botti
Head of International Business Development and Innovation,
FINCONS GROUP

Webinar: Tools for DASH Streaming

MPEG DASH is a standardised, widely-supported protocol for networked streaming – but how can you spot problems and tell if you or another vendor have implemented it right?

This webinar, run by HbbTV – an initiative aimed at merging over-the-air broadcast with broadband delivery (which includes both file-download and streaming) – sets out to explain how you can test your DASH streaming using new tools now available. For instance, HbbTV and DVB have collaborated on a DASH validation tool which checks MPDs, segments and more to be sure that a stream is compliant with both DVB and HbbTV specifications.

Bringing together the experience of Bob Campbell from Eurofins, Waqar Zia from Nomor Research and Juha Joki from Sofia Digital, anyone who develops for, or provides services based on DASH will benefit from this webinar.

Date: 18th June 2019, 16:00 BST / 17:00 CEST

Register now!

Speakers

Bob Campbell Bob Campbell
Directory of Engineering,
Eurofins Digital Testing
Juha Joki Juha Joki
Director, Broadcast & Testing
Sofia Digital
Waqar Zia Waqar Zia
Head of Multimedia Delivery,
Nomor Research GmbH

Webinar: Next Generation Audio & DVB

Webinar Date: 18th March 2019
Time: 14:00 GMT / 15:00 CET

Object oriented audio is a relatively new audio technique which doesn’t simply send audio as one track or two, but it sends individual audio objects – simplistically we can think of these as audio samples – which also come with some position information.

With non-object-orientated audio, there is very little a speaker system can do to adjust the audio to match. It was either created for 8 speakers, 6, or 2 etc. So if you have a system that only has 4 speakers or they are in unusual places, it’s a compromise to it sound right.

Object oriented audio sends the position information for some of the audio which means that the decoder can work out how much of the sound to put in each speaker to best represent that sound for whatever room and speaker set-up it has.

AC-4 from Dolby is one technology which allows objects to be sent with the audio. It still supports conventional 5.1 style sound but can also contain up to 7 audio objects. AC-4 is one NGA technology adopted by DVB for DASH.

In this webinar, Simon Tuff from the BBC discusses what the Audio Video Coding (AVC) experts of DVB have been working on to introduce Next Generation Audio (NGA) to the DVB specifications over recent years. With the latest version of TS 101 154, DVB’s guidelines for the use of video and audio coding in broadcast and broadband applications, being published by ETSI, it seems like a great time to unpack the audio part of the tool box and share the capabilities of NGA via a webinar.

No registration needed. Click here to watch on the day.

Speaker

Simon Tuff Simon Tuff
Principal Technologist
BBC