Video: Bandwidth Prediction in Low-Latency Chunked Streaming

How can we overcome one of the last, big, problems in making CMAF a generally available: making ABR work properly.

ABR, Adaptive Bitrate is a technique which allows a video player to choose what bitrate video to download from a menu of several options. Typically, the highest bitrate will have the highest quality and/or resolution, with the smallest files being low resolution.

The reason a player needs to have the flexibility to choose the bitrate of the video is mainly due to changing network conditions. If someone else on your network starts watching some video, this may mean you can no longer download video quick enough to keep watching in full quality HD and you may need to switch down. If they stop, then you want your player to switch up again to make the most of the bitrate available.

Traditionally this is done fairly simply by measuring how long each chunk of the video takes to download. Simply put, if you download a file, it will come to you as quickly as it can. So measuring how long each video chunk takes to get to you gives you an idea of how much bandwidth is available; if it arrives very slowly, you know you are close to running out of bandwidth. But in low-latency streaming, your are receiving video as quickly as it is produced so it’s very hard to see any difference in download times and this breaks the ABR estimation.

Making ABR work for low-latency is the topic covered by Ali in this talk at Mile High Video 2019 where he presents some of the findings from his recently published paper which he co-authored with, among others, Bitmovin’s Christian Timmerer and which won the DASH-IF Excellence in DASH award.

He starts by explaining how players currently behave with low-latency ABR showing how they miss out on changing to higher/lower renditions. Then he looks at the differences on the server and for the player between non-low-latency and low-latency streams. This lays the foundation to discuss ACTE – ABR for Chunked Transfer Encoding.

ACTE is a method of analysing bandwidth with the assumption that some chunks will be delivered as fast as the network allows and some won’t be. The trick is detecting which chunks actually show the network speed and Ali explains how this is done and shows the results of their evaluation.

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Speaker

Ali C. Begen Ali C. Begen
Technical Consultant and
Computer Science Professor

Video: Optimizing ABR Encode, Compute & Control for Performance & Quality

Adaptive bitrate, ABR, is vital in effective delivery of video to the home where bandwidth varies over time. It requires creating several different renditions of your content at various bitrates, resolutions and even frame rate. These multiple encodes put a computational burden on the transcode stage.

Lowell Winger explains ways of optimising ABR encodes to reduce the computation needed to create these different versions. He explains ways to use encoding decisions from one version and use them in other encodes. This has a benefit of being able to use decisions made on high-resolution versions – which are benefiting from high definition to inform the decision in detail – on low-resolution content where the decision would otherwise be made with a lot less information.

This talk is the type of deep dive into encoding techniques that you would expect from the Video Engineering Summit which happens at Streaming Media East.

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Speaker

Lowell Winger Lowell Winger
Former Senior Director of Engineering,
IDT Inc.

Video: ABR Streaming and CDN Performance

Hot on the heel’s of yesterday’s video all about Adaptive Bitrate (ABR) streaming we have research engineer Yuriy Reznik from Brightcove looking at the subject in detail. We outlined the use of ABR yesterday showing how it is fundamental to online streaming.

Brightcove, an online video hosting platform with its own video player, has a lot of experience of delivery over the CDN. We saw yesterday the principles that the player, and to an extent the server, can use to deal with changing network (and to an extent changing client CPU usage) by going up and down through the ABR ladder. However this talk focusses on how the CDN in the middle complicates matters as it tries its best to get the right chunks in the right place at the right time.

How often are there ‘cache misses’ where the right file isn’t already in place? And how can you predict what’s necessary?

Yuriy even goes in to detail about how to work out when HEVC deployment makes sense for you. After all, even if you do deploy HEVC – do you need to do it for all assets? And if you do only deploy for some assets, how do you know which? Also, when does it make sense to deploy CMAF? In this talk, we hear the answers.

The slides for this talk

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Speaker

Yuriy Reznik Yuriy Reznik
VP, Research
Brightcove

Video: Adaptive Bitrate Algorithms: How They Work

Streaming on the net relies on delivering video at a bandwidth you can handle. Called ‘Adaptive Bitrate’ or ABR, it’s hardly possible to think of streaming without it. While the idea might seem simple initially – just send several versions of your video – it quickly gets nuanced.

Streaming experts Streamroot take us through how ABR works at Streaming Media East from 2016. While the talk is a few years old, the facts are still the same so this remains a useful talk which not only introduces the topic but goes into detail on how to implement ABR.

The most common streaming format is HLS which relies on the player downloading the video in sections – small files – each representing around 3 to 10 seconds of video. For HLS and similar technologies, the idea is simply to allow the player, when it’s time to download the next part of the video, to choose from a selection of files each with the same video content but each at a different bitrate.

Allowing a player to choose which chunk it downloads means it can adapt to changing network conditions but does imply that each file has contain exactly the same frames of video else there would be a jump when the next file is played. So we have met our first complication. Furthermore, each encoded stream needs to be segmented in the same way and in MPEG, where you can only cut files on I-frame boundaries, it means the encoders need to synchronise their GOP structure giving us our second complication.

These difficulties, many more and Streamroot’s solutions are presented by Erica Beavers and Nikolay Rodionov including experiments and proofs of concept they have carried out to demonstrate the efficacy.

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Speakers

Erica Beavers Erica Beavers
Head of Marketing & Partnerships,
Streamroot
Nikolay Rodionov Nikolay Rodionov
Co-Founder, CPO
Streamroot