Video: The New Video Codec Landscape – VVC, EVC, HEVC, LC-EVC, AV1 and more

The codec arena is a lot more complex than before. Gone is the world of 5 years ago with AVC doing nearly everything. Whilst AVC is still a major force, we now have AV1 and VP9 being used globally with billions of uses a year, HEVC is not the force majeure it was once expected to be, but is now seeing significant use on iPhones and overall adoption continues to grow. And now, in 2020 we see three new codecs on the scene, VVC, EVC and LCEVC.

To help us make sense of this SMPTE has invited Walt Husak and Sean McCarthy to take us through what the current codecs are, what makes them different, how well they work, how to compare them and what the future roadmaps hold.

Sean starts by explaining which codecs are maintained by which bodies, with the IEC, ITU and MPEG being involved, not to mention the corporate codecs (VP8, and VP9 from Google) and the Chinese AVS series of codecs. Sean explains that these share major common elements and are each evolutions of each other. But why are all these codecs needed? Next, we see the use-cases that have brought these codecs into existence. Granted, AVC and HEVC entered the scene to reduce bit rate in an effort to make HD and UHD practical, respectively, but EVC and LC-EVC have different aims.

Sean gives a brief overview of the basics of encoding starting with partitioning the image, predicting parts of it, applying transformations, refining it (also known as applying ‘loop filters) and finishing with entropy codings. All of these blocks are briefly explained and exist in all the codecs covered in this talk. The evolutions which make the newer codecs better are therefore evolutions of each of these elements. For instance, explains Sean, splitting the image into different sections, known as partitioning, has become more sophisticated in recent codecs allowing for larger sections to be considered at once but, at the same time, smaller partitions created within each.

All codecs have profiles whereby the tools in use, or the complexity of their implementation, is standardised for certain types of video: 8-bit, 10-bit, HDR etc. This allows hardware implementers to understand the upper bounds of computation so they don’t end up over-provisioning hardware resources and increasing the cost. Sean looks at how VVC uses the same tools throughout all of its four profiles with only a few exceptions. Screen content sees two extra tools come for 4:2:2 formats and above. AV1 has the same tools throughout all the profiles but, deliberately, EVC doesn’t. Essential Video Coding has a royalty-free base layer which uses techniques that are not subject to any use payments. Using this layer gives you AVC-quality encoding, approximately. Using the main profile, however, gets you similar to HEVC encoding albeit with royalty payments.

The next part of the talk examines two main reasons for the increase in compression over recent codec generation, block size and partitioning, before highlighting some new tools in VVC and AV1. Block size refers to the size of the blocks that an image is split up into for processing. By using a larger block, the algorithms can spot patterns more efficiently so the continued increase from 16×16 in AVC to 128×128 now in VVC drives an increase in computation but also in compression. Once you have your block, splitting it up following the features of the images is the next stage. Called partitioning, we see the number of ways that the codecs can mathematically split a block has grown significantly. VVC can also partition chroma separately to luma. VVC and AV1 also include 64 and 16 ways, respectively, to diagonally partition rather than the typical vertical and horizontal partitioning modes.

Screen content coding tools are increasingly important, pandemics aside, there has long been growth in the amount of computer-generated content being shared online whether that’s through esports, video conference screen sharing or elsewhere. Truth be told, HEVC has support for screen-content encoding but it’s not in the main profile so many implementations don’t support it. VVC not only evolves the screen-content tools, but it also makes it present as default. AV1, also, was designed to work well with screen content. Sean takes some time to look at the IBC tool, intra-block copy, which allows the encoder to relate parts of the current frame to other sections. Working at the prediction stage, with screen content which contains, for instance, lots of text, parts of that text will look similar and to a first approximation, one part of the image can be duplicated in another. This is similar to motion compensation where a macroblock is ‘copied’ to another frame in a different position, but all the work is done on the present frame for Intra BC. Palette mode is another screen content tool which allows the colour of a section of the image to be described as a palette of colours rather than using the full RGB value for each and every pixel.

Sean covers the scaled prediction between resolutions in VVC and super-resolution in AV1, VVC’s 360-degree video optimisations and luma mapping before handing over to Walt Husak who goes into more detail on how the newer codecs work, starting with LCEVC.

LCEVC is a codec which improves the performance of already-deployed codecs, typically used to enhance the spatial resolution. If you wanted to encode HD, the codec would downsample the HD to an SD resolution and encode that with AVC, HEVC or another codec. At the same time, it would upsample that encoded video again and generate to correction layers which correct for artefacts and add sharpness. This information is added into to the base codec and sent to the decoder. This can allow a software-only enhancement to a hardware deployment fully utilising the hardware which has already been deployed. Walt notes that the enhancement layers are much the same technology as has already been standardised by SMPTE as VC6 (ST 2117). LCEVC has been found to be computationally efficient allowing it to address markets such as embedded devices where hardware restrictions would otherwise prohibit use of higher resolutions than for which it was originally designed. Very low bitrate performance is also very good.

Sean introduces us to his “Dos and Don’ts” of codec comparisons. The theme running through them is to take care that you are comparing like for like. Codecs can be set to run ‘fast’ or ‘slow’ each of which holds its own compromises in terms of encoding time and resulting quality. Similarly, there are some implementations which are made simply to implement the standard as rigorously as possible which is an invaluable tool when developing the codec or an implementation. Such a reference implementation for codec X, clearly, shouldn’t be compared to production implementations of a codec Y as the times are guaranteed to be very different and you will not learn anything from the process. Similarly, there are different tools which give codecs much more time to optimise known as single- and double-pass which shouldn’t be cross-compared.

The talk draws to a close with a look at codec performance. Sean shows a number of graphs showing how VVC performs against HEVC. Interestingly the metrics clearly show a 40% increase in efficiency of VVC over HEVC, but when seen in subjective tests, the ratings show a 50% improvement. VVC’s encoder is approximately 10x as complex as HEVC’s.

HEVC and AV1 perform similarly for the same bit rate. Overall, Sean says, AV1 is a little blurrier in regions of spatial detail and can have some temporal flickering. HEVC is more likely to have blocking and ringing artefacts. EVC’s main profile is up to 29% better than HEVC. LCEVC performs up to 8% better than AVC when using an AVC base layer and also slightly better than HEVC when using an HEVC base codec. Sean makes the point that the AVC has been continually updated since its initial release and is now on version 27, so it’s not strictly true to simply say it’s an ‘old’ codec. HEVC similarly is on version 7. Sean runs down part of the roadmap for AVC which leads on to the use of AI in codecs.

Finishing the video, Walt looks at the use of Deep Learning in codecs. Deep learning is also known as machine learning and referred to as AI (Artificial Intelligence). For most people, these terms are interchangeable and refer to the ability of a signal to be manipulated not by a fixed equation or algorithm (such as Lanczos scaling) but by a computer that has been trained through many millions of examples to recognise what looks ‘right’ and to replicate that effect in new scenarios.

Walt talks about JPEG’s AI learning research on still images who are aiming to complete an ‘end-to-end’ study of compression with AI tools. There’s also MPEG’s Deep Neural Network-based Video Coding which is looking at which tools within codecs can be replaced with AI. Also, recently we have seen the foundation of the MPAI (Moving Picture, Audio and Data Coding by Artificial Intelligence) organisation by Leonardo Chiariglione, an industry body devoted to the use of AI in compression. With all this activity, it’s clear that future advances in compression will be driven by the increasing use of these techniques.

The video ends with a Q&A session.

Watch now!
Find out more on SMPTE’s site
Speakers

Sean McCarthy Sean McCarthy
Director, Video Strategy and Standards,
Dolby Laboratories
Walt Husak Walt Husak
Director, Image Technologies,
Dolby Laboratories

Video:Measuring Video Quality with VMAF – Why You Should Care

VMAF, from Netflix, has become a popular tool for evaluating video quality since its launch as an Open Source project in 2017. Coming out of research from the University of Southern California and The University of Texas at Austin, it’s seen as one of the leading ways to automate video assessment.

Netflix’s Christos Bampis gives us a brief overview of VMAF’s origins and its aims. VMAF came about because other metrics such as MS-SSIM and, in particular, PSNR aren’t close enough indicators of quality. Indeed, Christos shows that when it comes to animated content (i.e. anime and cartoons) subjective scores can be very high, but if we look at the PSNR score it can be the same as the PSNR of score another live-action video clip which humans rate a lot lower, subjectively. Moreover, in less extreme examples, Christos explains. PSNR is often 5% or so away from the actual subjective score in either direction.

To a simple approximation, VMAF is a method of bringing out the spatial and temporal information from a video frame in a way which emphasises the types of things humans are attuned to such as contrast masking. Christos shows an example of a picture where artefacts in the trees are much harder to see than similar artefacts on a colour gradient such as a sky or still water. These extraction methods take account of situations like this and are then fed into a trained model which matches the results of the model with the numbers that humans would have given it. The idea being that when trained on many examples, it can correctly predict a human’s score given a set of data extracted from a picture. Christos shows examples of how well VMAF out-performs PSNR in gauging video quality.

 

Challenges are in focus in the second half of the talk. What are the things which still need working on to improve VMAF? Christos zooms in on two: design dimensionality and noise. By design dimensionality, he means how can VMAF be extended to be more general, delivering a number which has a consistent meaning in different scenarios? As the VMAF model has been trained on AVC, how can we deal with different artefacts which are seen with different codecs? Do we need a new model for HDR content instead of SDR and how should viewing conditions, whether ambient light or resolution and size of the display device, be brought into the metric? The second challenge Christos highlights is noise as he reveals VMAF tends to give lower scores than it should to noisy sources. Codecs like AV1 have film-grain synthesis tools and these need to be evaluated, so behaving correctly in the presence of video noise is important.

The talk finishes with Christos outlining that VMAF’s applicability to the industry is only increasing with new codecs coming out such as LCEVC, VCC, AV1 and more – such diversity in the codec ecosystem wasn’t an obvious prediction in 2014 when the initial research work was started. Christos underlines the fact that VMAF is a continually evolving metric which is Open Source and open to contributions. The Q&A covers failure cases, super-resolution and how to interpret close-call results which are only 1% different.

Watch now!
Download the presentation
Speaker

Christos Bampis Christos Bampis
Senior Software Engineer,
Netflix

Video: Encoding Vs Compute Efficiency in Video Coding

Ioannis Katsavounidis from Facebook joins us to talk us through his work finding the best balance between computation and encoding. He explains how encoding has moved from real-time, hardware-based encoding in the late 80s and 1990s through to file encoding, chunk-based encoding and now shot-based encoding. Each of these stages has brought opportunities to speed up encoding, but there has always been a fundamental reason why encoding can’t simply be sped up by the advance of IT.

Moore’s law posits that every year, the number of transistors in chips doubles. Whilst this has continued to be true until recent years, transistors have always been a proxy for processing power. For many years now, the way to keep the computational ability of CPUs high has been not to increase clock-speed as it was twenty years ago, but to add cores to the chip. As each core acts as its own CPU, this gives the ability to execute code in parallel with a thread of code running separately on each core. Whilst 12-20 cores are typical for servers, there are CPUs which deliver up to 128 cores.

Ioannis explains why DCT-based codecs are resistant to multi-thread encoding by showing how some of the encoding decisions are based on the previously decoded video frame so the encoder needs to decode the video before it has the information it needs to make the next encode decisions. An example of this motion estimation where you need to understand what a macroblock looks like in order to detail if and how it can be moved to form part of the macroblock currently being encoded.

It turns out that some of the information you need to calculate can be found from the original video. Whilst this doesn’t provide full parallelisation, it does help in freeing some of the computation to be done in parallel thus reducing the length of time spent on the linear encoding stage. As the design of the codec itself is limited in its ability to be parallelised, the best way to speed up encoding has been to split up the original video and encode these, now separate, sections independently.

Speeding up video encoding has therefore focused on splitting up the video into different sections and encoding those in parallel rather than trying to parallelise the encoding itself due. Encoding each frame separately is one way to do this, but sacrifices encoding efficiency. Splitting each frame up into sections (tiles or slices) is another way, though this also sacrifices either quality or bitrate. The most successful encoding parallelisation has been chunked encoding. As streaming applications use chunks, typically around 2 seconds nowadays, there’s no reason not to just cut your video up into small sections and encode those separately; the whole of this video focuses on non-live video.

If there’s a shot change in the middle of your chunk, this is likely to look very bad since the motion estimation will fail to produce good results and there may not be enough bitrate budget to compensate. Therefore it’s best to drop in an IDR frame at the shot change or to actually change your video chunks to match shot changes. Simply encoding these chunks in parallel would speed up the encoding, however, it misses an opportunity to optimise quality vs bitrate.

Ioannis explains an experiment to determine the best operating point for chunks. He does that by reminding us that all encoders have certain ‘speed’ settings which control how much computation, and therefore time, is required for each encode. The ‘very fast’ setting in x264 will encode at the highest speed possible, but the quality will be worse or a certain bitrate compared to the ‘very slow’ setting. Ioannis’s experiment encoded each chunk at every speed setting for a variety of resolutions and bitrates. Each encode was then analysed for quality using PSNR, MS-SSIM and VMAF.

From Ioannis’ work, we can see how the bitrate setting affects both the encode time and the quality and we can observe that the slower speeds tend to have minimal quality advantages for the significant extra time involved in the encoding. Each curve has a steep part and a shallow section with the transition between known as the ‘convex hull’. Choosing a setting on the convex hull portion of the line is the optimal balance between quality and encoding time and is where, says Ioannis, most people should aim to operate.

The talk finishes with a summary of the conclusions which can be drawn from this work looking at the use of convex-hull which we’ve just discussed, the best type of parallel processing, whether oversubscription of CPU cores is helpful or not and an interesting observation that it’s often the metrics which put a significant burden on encoding rather than the video encoding itself, particularly for lower resolutions.

Watch now!
Speakers

Ioannis Katsavounidis Ioannis Katsavounidis
Research Scientist,
Facebook

Video: Optimal Design of Encoding Profiles for Web Streaming

With us since 1998, ABR (Adaptive Bitrate) has been allowing streaming players to select a stream appropriate for their computer and bandwidth. But in this video, we hear that over 20 years on, we’re still developing ways to understand and optimise the performance of ABRs for delivery, finding the best balance of size and quality.

Brightcove’s Yuriy Reznik takes us deep into the theory, but start at the basics of what ABR is and why we. use it. He covers how it delivers a whole series os separate streams at different resolutions and bitrates. Whilst that works well, he quickly starts to show the downsides of ‘static’ ABR profiles. These are where a provider decides that all assets will be encoded at the same set bitrate of 6 or 7 bitrates even though some titles such as cartoons will require less bandwidth than sports programmes. This is where per-title and other encoding techniques come in.

Netflix coined the term ‘per-title encoding’ which has since been called content-aware encoding. This takes in to consideration the content itself when determining the bitrate to encode at. Using automatic processes to determine objective quality of a sample encode, it is able to determine the optimum bitrate.

Content & network-aware encoding takes into account the network delivery as part of the optimisation as well as the quality of the final video itself. It’s able to estimate the likelihood of a stream being selected for playback based upon its bitrate. The trick is combining these two factors simultaneously to find the optimum bitrate vs quality.

The last element to add in order to make this ABR optimisation as realistic as practical is to take into account the way people actually view the content. Looking at a real example from the US open, we see how on PCs, the viewing window can be many different sizes and you can calculate the probability of the different sizes being used. Furthermore we know there is some intelligence in the players where they won’t take in a stream with a resolution which is much bigger than the browser viewport.

Yuriy brings starts the final section of his talk by explaining that he brought in another quality metric from Westerink & Roufs which allows him to estimate how people see video which has been encoded at a certain resolution which is then scaled to a fixed interim resolution for decoding and then to the correct size for the browser windows.

The result of adding in this further check shows that fewer points on the ladder tend to be better, giving an overall higher quality value. Going much beyond 3 is typically not useful for the website. Shows only a few resolutions needed to get good average quality. Adding more isn’t so useful.

Yuriy finishes by introducing SSIM modeling of the noise of an encoder at different bitrates. Bringing together all of these factors, modelled as equations, allows him to suggest optimal ABR ladders.

Watch now!
Speaker

Yuriy Reznik Yuriy Reznik
Technology Fellow and Head of Research,
Brightcove