Video:Measuring Video Quality with VMAF – Why You Should Care

VMAF, from Netflix, has become a popular tool for evaluating video quality since its launch as an Open Source project in 2017. Coming out of research from the University of Southern California and The University of Texas at Austin, it’s seen as one of the leading ways to automate video assessment.

Netflix’s Christos Bampis gives us a brief overview of VMAF’s origins and its aims. VMAF came about because other metrics such as MS-SSIM and, in particular, PSNR aren’t close enough indicators of quality. Indeed, Christos shows that when it comes to animated content (i.e. anime and cartoons) subjective scores can be very high, but if we look at the PSNR score it can be the same as the PSNR of score another live-action video clip which humans rate a lot lower, subjectively. Moreover, in less extreme examples, Christos explains. PSNR is often 5% or so away from the actual subjective score in either direction.

To a simple approximation, VMAF is a method of bringing out the spatial and temporal information from a video frame in a way which emphasises the types of things humans are attuned to such as contrast masking. Christos shows an example of a picture where artefacts in the trees are much harder to see than similar artefacts on a colour gradient such as a sky or still water. These extraction methods take account of situations like this and are then fed into a trained model which matches the results of the model with the numbers that humans would have given it. The idea being that when trained on many examples, it can correctly predict a human’s score given a set of data extracted from a picture. Christos shows examples of how well VMAF out-performs PSNR in gauging video quality.

 

Challenges are in focus in the second half of the talk. What are the things which still need working on to improve VMAF? Christos zooms in on two: design dimensionality and noise. By design dimensionality, he means how can VMAF be extended to be more general, delivering a number which has a consistent meaning in different scenarios? As the VMAF model has been trained on AVC, how can we deal with different artefacts which are seen with different codecs? Do we need a new model for HDR content instead of SDR and how should viewing conditions, whether ambient light or resolution and size of the display device, be brought into the metric? The second challenge Christos highlights is noise as he reveals VMAF tends to give lower scores than it should to noisy sources. Codecs like AV1 have film-grain synthesis tools and these need to be evaluated, so behaving correctly in the presence of video noise is important.

The talk finishes with Christos outlining that VMAF’s applicability to the industry is only increasing with new codecs coming out such as LCEVC, VCC, AV1 and more – such diversity in the codec ecosystem wasn’t an obvious prediction in 2014 when the initial research work was started. Christos underlines the fact that VMAF is a continually evolving metric which is Open Source and open to contributions. The Q&A covers failure cases, super-resolution and how to interpret close-call results which are only 1% different.

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Speaker

Christos Bampis Christos Bampis
Senior Software Engineer,
Netflix

Video: Towards Measuring Perceptual Video Quality & Why

In the ongoing battle to find the minimum bitrate for good looking video, automation is key to achieving this quickly and cheaply. However, metrics like PSNR don’t always give the best answers meaning that eyes are still better the job than silicon.

In this talk from the Demuxed conference, Intel’s Vasavee Vijayaraghavan shows us examples of computer analysis failing to identify lowest bitrate leaving the encoder spending many megabits encoding video so that it looks imperceptibly better. Further more it’s clear that MOS – the Mean Opinion Score – which has a well defined protocol behind it continues to produce the best results, though setting up and co-ordinating takes orders of magnitude more time and money.

Vasavee shows how she’s managed to develop a hybrid workflow which combines metrics and MOS scores to get much of the benefit of computer-generated metrics fed into the manual MOS process. This allows a much more targeted subjective perceptual quality MOS process thereby speeding up the whole process but still getting that human touch where it’s most valuable.

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Speaker

Vasavee Vijayaraghavan Vasavee Vijayaraghavan
Cloud Media Solutions Architect,
Intel

Video: Tidying Up (Bits on the Internet)

Netflix’s Anne Aaron explains how VMAF came about and how AV1 is going to benefit both the business and the viewers.

VMAF is a method for computers to calculate the quality of a video in a way which would match a human’s opinion. Standing for Video Multi-Method Assessment Fusion, Anne explains that it’s a combination (fusion) of more than one metric each harnessing different aspects. She presents data showing the increased correlation between VMAF and real-life tests.

Anne’s job is to maximise enjoyment of content through efficient use of bandwidth. She explains there are many places with wireless data is limited so getting the maximum amount of video through that bandwidth cap is an essential part of Netflix’s business health.

This ties in with why Netflix is part of the Alliance for Open Media who are in the process of specifying AV1, the new video codec which promises bitrate improvements over-and-above HEVC. Anne expands on this and presents the aim to deliver 32 hours of video using AV1 for 4Gb subscribers.

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Speaker

Anne Aaron

Video: Per-title Encoding at Scale

MUX is a very pro-active company pushing forward streaming technology. At NAB 2019 they have announced Audience Adaptive Encoding which is offers encodes tailored to both your content but also the typical bitrate of your viewing demographic. Underpinning this technology is machine learning and their Per-title encoding technology which was released last year.

This talk with Nick Chadwick looks at what per-title encoding is, how you can work out which resolutions and bitrates to encode at and how to deliver this as a useful product.

Nick takes some time to explain MUX’s ‘convex hulls’ which give a shape to the content’s performance at different bitrates and helps visualise the optimum encoding parameters the content. Moreover we see that using this technique, we see some surprising circumstances when it makes sense to start at high resolutions, even for low bitrates.

Looking then at how to actually work out on a title-by-title basis, Nick explains the pros and cons of the different approaches going on to explain how MUX used machine learning to generate the model they created to make this work.

Finishing off with an extensive Q&A, this talk is a great overview on how to pick great encoding parameters, manually or otherwise.

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Speaker

Nick Chadwick Nick Chadwick
Software Engineer,
Mux Inc.