Video: Low-latency DASH Streaming Using Open Source Tools

Low Latency Dash also known as LL-DASH is a modification of MPEG DASH to allow it to operate with close to two seconds’ latency bringing it down to meet, or beat, standard broadcast signals.

Brightcove’s Bo Zhang starts by outlining the aims and methods of getting there. For instance, he explains, the HTTP 1.1 Chunked Transfer element is key to low-latency streaming as it allows the server to start sending a video segment as its being written, not waiting until the file is complete. LL-DASH also has the ability to state an availability window (‘availabilityTimeOffset’).

As LL-MPEG DASH is a living standard, there are updates on the way: Resync points will allow a player to receive a list of places where it can join a stream using SAP types in the ISO-BMFF spec, the server can send a ‘service description’ to the player which can use the information to adjust its latency. Event messages can now be inserted in the middle of segments.

Bo then moves on to explain that he and the team have set up and experiment to gain experience with LL-DASH and test overall latency. He shows that they decided to stream RTMP out of OBS, into a github project called ‘node-gpac-dash’ then to the dash.js player all. between Boston and Seattle. This test runs at 800×600, 30fps with a bitrate of 2.5Mbps and shows results of between 2.5 and 5 seconds depending on the network conditions.

As Bo moves towards the Q&A, he says that low-latency streaming is less scalable because a TCP connection needs to be kept open between the player and the CDN which is a burden.
Another compromise is that smaller chunk sizes in LL-DASH give reduced latency but IO increases meaning sometimes you may have to increase the chunk sizes (and hence latency of the stream) to allow for better performance. He also adds that adverts are more difficult with low-latency streams due to the short amount of time to request and receive the advertising.

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More detail about the experiments in this talk can be found in Bo’s
blog post.
Speakers

Bo Zhang Bo Zhang
Staff Video System Engineer, Research
Brightcove

Video: Web Media Standards

The internet has been a continuing story of proprietary technologies being overtaken by open technologies, from the precursors to TCP/IP, to Flash/RTMP video delivery, to HLS. Understanding the history of why these technologies appear, why they are subsumed by open standards and how boost in popularity that happens at that transition is important to help us make decisions now and foresee how the technology landscape may look in five or ten years’ time.

This talk, by Jonn Simmons, is a talk of two halves. Looking first at the history of how our standards coalesced into what we have today will fill in many blanks and make the purpose of current technologies like MPEG DASH & CMAF clearer. He then looks at how we can understand what we have today in light of similar situations in the past answering the question whether we are at an inflexion point in technology.

John first looks at the importance of making DRM-protected content portable in the same way as non-protected content was easy to move between computers and systems. This was in response to a WIPO analysis which, as many would agree, concluded that this was essential to enable legal video use on the internet. In 2008, Mircosoft analysed all the elements needed, beyond the simple encryption, to allow such media to be portable. It would require HTML extensions for delivery, DRM signalling, authentication, a standard protocol for Adaptive Delivery (also known as ABR) and an adaptive container format. We then take a walk through the timeline staring in 2009 through to 2018 seeing the beginnings and published availability of such technologies Common Encryption, MPEG DASH and CMAF.

Milestones for Web Media Portability

John then walks through these key technologies starting with the importance of Common Encryption (also known as CENC). Previously all the DRM methods had their own container formats. Harmonisation of DRM is, likely, never going to happen so we’ll always have Apple’s own, Google’s own, Microsoft’s and plenty of others. For streaming providers, it’s a major problem to deliver all the different formats and makes for messy, duplicative workflows. Common Encryption allows for one container format which can contain any DRM information allowing for a single workflow with different inputs. On the player side, the player can, now, simply accept a single stream of DRM information, authenticate with the appropriate service and decode the video.

CMAF is another key technology called out by John in enabling portability of media. It was co-developed with Apple to enable a common media format for HLS and DASH. We’ve covered this before on The Broadcast Knowledge starting with the ISO BMFF format on which DASH and CMAF are based, Will Law’s famous ‘Chunky Monkey’ talk and many more. We recently covered FuboTV’s talk on how they distribute HLS & DASH multi-codec encoding and packaging.

Also highlighted by John. are the JavasScript Media Source Extensions and Encrypted Media Extensions which allow interaction from browsers/JavaScript with both ABR/Adaptive Streaming and DRM. He then talks about CTA WAVE which is a project that specifically aims to improve streamed media experiences on consumer devices, CTA being the Consumer Technology Association who are behind the annual CES exhibition in Las Vegas.

What is often less apparent is the current work happening developing new standards and specifications. John calls out a number of different projects within W3C and MPEG such as Low latency support for CMAF, MSE and codec switching in MSE. Work on ad signalling period boundaries and SCTE-35 is making its debut into JavaScript with some ongoing work to create the link between ad markers and JS applications. He also calls out VVC and AV1 mappings into CMAF.

In the second part of the presentation, John asked ‘where will we end up?’ John draws upon two examples. One is the number of TCP/IP hosts between 1980 and 1992. He shows it was clear that when TCP/IP was publicly available there was an exponential increase in adoption of TCP/IP, moving on from proprietary network interfaces available in the years before. Similarly with websites between 1990 and 1997. Exponential growth happened after 1993 when the standard was set for Web Clients. This did take a few years to have a marked effect, but the number of websites moved from a flat ‘less than 100’ number to 600, then 10,000 in 1994 increasing to a quarter of a million by 1995 and then over one million in 1996. This shows the difference between the power ‘walled garden’ environments and the open internet.

John sees media technology today as still having a number of ‘traditional’ walled gardens such as DISH and Sky TV. He sees people self-serving multiple walled gardens to create their own larger pool of media options, typically known as ‘cord cutters’. He, therefore, sees two options for the future. One is ever larger walled gardens where large companies aggregate the content of smaller content owners/providers. The other option is having cloud services that act as a one-stop-shop for your media, but dynamically authenticate against whichever service is needed. This is a much more open environment without the need to be separately subscribing to each and every outlet in the traditional sense.

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Speakers

John Simmons John Simmons
W3C Evangelist, Media & Entertainment
W3C

Video: Scalable Per-User Ad Insertion in Live OTT

Targetted ads are the most valuable ads, but making sure the right person gets the right ad is tricky, not only in deciding who to show which ad to, but in scaling – and keeping track of – the ad infrastructure to thousands or millions of viewers. This video explains how this complexity arises and the techniques that Hulu have implemented to improve the situation.

Zachary Cava from Hulu lays out the way that standard advertising works for live streams. Whilst he uses MPEG DASH as an example, much the same is true of HLS. This starts with cutting up the video into sections which all start with an IDR frame for seeking. SCTE 35 is used to indicate times when ads can be inserted. These are called SCTE Markers. As DASH has the principle of defining a period (exactly as it sounds, just a way of marking a section of time), we can define periods of ‘programme’ and periods for ‘ads’. This allows the possibility of swapping out a whole period for a section of several ads.

If it were as simple as just swapping out whole periods, that would be Server-Side Ad Insertion. For per-user targetted ads, the streaming service has to keep track of every ad which was given to a user so that when they rewind, they have a consistent experience. This can mean remembering millions of ads for services which have a large rewind buffer. Moreover, traffic can become overwhelming as, since the requests are unique, a CDN can’t help in the caching. Whilst you can scale your system, the cost can spiral up beyond the revenue practical.

Enter MPD Patch Requests. This addition to MPEG Dash requires the client to remember the whole of the manifest. Where the client has a gap in its knowledge, it can simply request that section from the server which generates a ‘diff’, returning only the changes, which the client then assimilates into memory. The benefit here is that all the clients end up converging on only requesting what’s happening ‘now’ and so CDNs come back in to play. Zachary explains how this works in more detail and shows examples before explaining how URLQueryInfo helps reduce the complexity of URL parameters, again in order to interoperate better with CDNs and allows the ad system to be scaled separately to the main video assets.

Finally, Zachary takes a look at coming back from an ad break where you may find that your ads were longer then the ad period allotted or that the programme hasn’t returned before the ads finished. During the ad break, the client is still polling for updates so it’s possible to quickly update the manifest and swap back to programme video early. Similarly at the end of a break, if there is still no content, the server can start issuing its own ad or content, effectively moving back to server-side ad insertion. However, this is not necessarily just plain ad insertion, explains Zachary, rather Hulu cal it ‘Server-Guided’ ad insertion. There is no stitching on the server, but the server is informing you where to get the next video from. It also allows for some levels of user separation where some larger geographies can see different ads to those from other areas.

Zachary finishes by outlining the work Hulu is doing to feedback this learning into the DASH spec, via the DASH Industry Forum and their work with the industry at large to bring more consistency to SCTE 35 markers.

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Speaker

Zachary Cava Zachary Cava
Software Architect,
Hulu

Video: A State-of-the-Industry Webinar: Apple’s LL-HLS is finally here

Even after restrictions are lifted, it’s estimated that overall streaming subscriptions will remain 10% higher than before the pandemic. We’ve known for a long time that streaming is here to stay and viewers want their live streams to arrive quickly and on-par with broadcast TV. There have been a number of attempts at this, the streaming community extended HLS to create LHLS which brought down latency quite a lot without making major changes to the defacto standard.

MPEG’s DASH also has created a standard for low-latency streaming allowing CMAF to be used to get the latency down even further than LHLS. Then Apple, the inventors of the original HLS, announced low-latency HLS (LL-HLS). We’ve looked at all of these previously here on The Broadcast Knowledge. This Online Streaming Primer is a great place to start. If you already know the basics, then there’s no better than Will Law to explain the details.

The big change that’s happened since Will Law’s talk above, is that Apple have revised their original plan. This talk from CTO and Founder of THEOplayer, Pieter-Jan Speelmans, explains how Apple’s modified its approach to low-latency. Starting with a reminder of the latency problem with HLS, Pieter-Jan explains how Apple originally wanted to implement LL-HLS with HTTP/2 push and the problems that caused. This has changed now, and this talk gives us the first glimpse of how well this works.

Pieter-Jan talks about how LL-DASH streams can be repurposed to LL-HLS, explains the protocol overheads and talks about the optimal settings regarding segment and part length. He explains how the segment length plays into both overall latency but also start-up latency and the ability to navigate the ABR ladder without buffering.

There was a lot of frustration initially within the community at the way Apple introduced LL-HLS both because of the way it was approached but also the problems implementing it. Now that the technical issues have been, at least partly, addressed, this is the first of hopefully many talks looking at the reality of the latest version. With an expected ‘GA’ date of September, it’s not long before nearly all Apple devices will be able to receive LL-HLS and using the protocol will need to be part of the playbook of many streaming services.

Watch now to get the full detail

Speaker

Pieter-Jan Speelmans Pieter-Jan Speelmans
CTO & Founder
THEOplayer