Webinar: Next Generation Audio & DVB

Webinar Date: 18th March 2019
Time: 14:00 GMT / 15:00 CET

Object oriented audio is a relatively new audio technique which doesn’t simply send audio as one track or two, but it sends individual audio objects – simplistically we can think of these as audio samples – which also come with some position information.

With non-object-orientated audio, there is very little a speaker system can do to adjust the audio to match. It was either created for 8 speakers, 6, or 2 etc. So if you have a system that only has 4 speakers or they are in unusual places, it’s a compromise to it sound right.

Object oriented audio sends the position information for some of the audio which means that the decoder can work out how much of the sound to put in each speaker to best represent that sound for whatever room and speaker set-up it has.

AC-4 from Dolby is one technology which allows objects to be sent with the audio. It still supports conventional 5.1 style sound but can also contain up to 7 audio objects. AC-4 is one NGA technology adopted by DVB for DASH.

In this webinar, Simon Tuff from the BBC discusses what the Audio Video Coding (AVC) experts of DVB have been working on to introduce Next Generation Audio (NGA) to the DVB specifications over recent years. With the latest version of TS 101 154, DVB’s guidelines for the use of video and audio coding in broadcast and broadband applications, being published by ETSI, it seems like a great time to unpack the audio part of the tool box and share the capabilities of NGA via a webinar.

No registration needed. Click here to watch on the day.

Speaker

Simon Tuff Simon Tuff
Principal Technologist
BBC

Video: Visual Excellence in Production

In this Tech Talk we shall hear from researchers and vision scientists, how they are ensuring the precision of HDR and colour in image capture.

Today’s imaging technology strives to produce a viewing experience which is, as far as possible, identical with that perceived by the human visual system. Strangely, one limiting factor in high dynamic range (HDR) design has been that existing measurements of the human vision have not been sufficiently accurate. Another of these issues is skin tone: humans are particularly sensitive to skin colour – regarding it as an indicator of well-being. The accurate portrayal of this subtle parameter is therefore particularly important. A further interesting image quality issue is slow motion – here we explore the development of an 8K UHD 240fps camera and slow motion capture and replay server.

Watch now!

Speakers

Lucien Lenzen Lucien Lenzen
Research Assistant
Hochschule RheinMain
Simon Thompson Simon Thompson
Project R&D Engineer
BBC
Patrick Morvan Patrick Morvan
Senior R&D Engineer
Technicolor
Simon Gauntlett Simon Gauntlett
Director of Imaging Standards and Technology
Dolby Laboratories