Video: Everything You Wanted to Know About ATSC 3.0

ATSC 3.0 is the next sea change in North American broadcasting, shared with South Korea, Mexico and other locations. Depending on your viewpoint, this could be as fundamental as the move to digital lockstep with the move to HD programming all those years ago.

ATSC 3.0 takes terrestrial broadcasting in to the IP world meaning everything transmitted over the air is done over IP and it brings with it the ability to split the bandwidth into separate pipes.

Here, Dr. Richard Chernock presents a detailed description of the available features within ATSC. He explains the new constellations and modulation properties delving into the ability to split your transmission bandwidth into separate ‘pipes’. These pipes can have different modulation parameters, robustness etc. The switch from 8VSB to OFDM allows for Single Frequency Networks which can actually help reception (due to guard intervals).

Additionally, the standard supports HEVC and scalable video (SHVC) whereby a single UHD encode can be sent which has an HD base-layer which can be decoded by every decoder plus an ‘enhancement layer’ which can be optionally decoded to produce a full UHD output for those decoders/displays which an support it.

With the move to IP, there is a blurring of broadcast and broadband. This can be used to deliver extra audios via broadband to be played with the main video and can be used as a return path to the broadcaster which can help with interactivity and audience measurement.

Dr. Chernock covers HDR, better pixels and Next Generation Audio as well as Emergency Alerts functionality improvements and accessibility features.

Speaker

Dr. Richard Chernock Dr. Richard Chernock
Chief Science Officer,
Triveni Digital

Webinar: Next Generation Audio & DVB

Webinar Date: 18th March 2019
Time: 14:00 GMT / 15:00 CET

Object oriented audio is a relatively new audio technique which doesn’t simply send audio as one track or two, but it sends individual audio objects – simplistically we can think of these as audio samples – which also come with some position information.

With non-object-orientated audio, there is very little a speaker system can do to adjust the audio to match. It was either created for 8 speakers, 6, or 2 etc. So if you have a system that only has 4 speakers or they are in unusual places, it’s a compromise to it sound right.

Object oriented audio sends the position information for some of the audio which means that the decoder can work out how much of the sound to put in each speaker to best represent that sound for whatever room and speaker set-up it has.

AC-4 from Dolby is one technology which allows objects to be sent with the audio. It still supports conventional 5.1 style sound but can also contain up to 7 audio objects. AC-4 is one NGA technology adopted by DVB for DASH.

In this webinar, Simon Tuff from the BBC discusses what the Audio Video Coding (AVC) experts of DVB have been working on to introduce Next Generation Audio (NGA) to the DVB specifications over recent years. With the latest version of TS 101 154, DVB’s guidelines for the use of video and audio coding in broadcast and broadband applications, being published by ETSI, it seems like a great time to unpack the audio part of the tool box and share the capabilities of NGA via a webinar.

No registration needed. Click here to watch on the day.

Speaker

Simon Tuff Simon Tuff
Principal Technologist
BBC