Video: Analysis of emerging video codecs: coding tools, compression efficiency and complexity

There continues to be fervent activity in codec development and it’s widely expected that there won’t be a single successor to AVC (h.264). Vying for one of the spots is AV1 but also MPEG’s VVC.

In this talk at SMPTE 2018, Julien Le Tanou from MediaKind compares the coding tools used by VVC and AV1 and explains the methodology he uses to compare the two codecs. We see the increase in decoding time compared to HEVC required for VVC as well as the famously slow AV1. We also see the bitrate savings with VVC performing better.

Julien also presents subjective results which are not correlated to the objective results and explains reasons for this.

Watch now!

Speakers

Julien Le Tanou Julien Le Tanou
Senior Engineer, Video Compression,
MediaKind

Video: AV1/VVC Update

AV1 and VVC are both new codecs on the scene. Codecs touch our lives every day both at work and at home. They are the only way that anyone receives audio and video online and television. So all together they’re pretty important and finding better ones generates a lot of opinion.

So what are AV1 and VVC? VVC is one of the newest codecs on the block and is undergoing standardisation in MPEG. VVC builds on the technologies standardised by HEVC but adds many new coding tools. The standard is likely to enter draft phase before the end of 2019 resulting in it being officially standardised around a year later. For more info on VVC, check out Bitmovin’s VVC intro from Demuxed

AV1 is a new but increasingly known codec, famous for being royalty free and backed by Netflix, Apple and many other big hyper scale players. There have been reports that though there is no royalty levied on it, patent holders have still approached big manufacturers to discuss financial reimbursement so its ‘free’ status is a matter of debate. Whilst there is a patent defence programme, it is not known if it’s sufficient to insulate larger players. Much further on than VVC, AV1 has already had a code freeze and companies such as Bitmovin have been working hard to reduce the encode times – widely known to be very long – and create live services.

Here, Christian Feldmann from Bitmovin gives us the latest status on AV1 and VVC. Christian discusses AV1’s tools before discussing VVC’s tools pointing out the similarities that exist. Whilst AV1 is being supported in well known browsers, VVC is at the beginning.

There’s a look at the licensing status of each codec before a look at EVC – which stands for Essential Video Coding. This has a royalty free baseline profile so is of interest to many. Christian shares results from a Technicolor experiment.

Speakers

Christian Feldmann Christian Feldmann
Codec Engineer,
Bitmovin

Video: The state of advanced codecs; separating hype from reality

There are a lot of codecs both new and old that are in use or vying to be the next big thing. Tom Vaughan helps us see what they really can achieve and where each one is useful.

Recorded at San Francisco Video Tech Meetup in September, this video starts with a look at a the ‘hype cycle’. Tom places each codec, from MPEG 2 to VVC on the curve before looking at what the barriers to adoption are.

Tom then looks at HEVC discussing which devices can receive it, which can create it, the streaming services which support it and where adoption is likely to be. Finally, HEVC discussion is complete without a look at the HEVC patent landscape Venn diagram.

The focus then shifts to the Alliance for Open Media and their AV1 codec, its patent status and technical progress to date. He then discusses the performance of AV1, HEVC and Beamr against each other.

Almost brand new out of the starting blocks is VVC from MPEG and the Media Coding Industry Forum (MC-IF). Tom explains the aims of the forum and the VVC codec they are creating before taking questions from the floor.

Watch now!

Speaker

Tom Vaughan Tom Vaughan
VP Strategy,
Beamr

Video: VVC – the Next-Next Gen Codec

VVC is a new standard going through MPEG standardisation which is being increasingly discussed. Dubbed the next, next-gen Codec, it promises to deliver many improvements over current Codecs.

Christian Feldmann from Bitmovin takes us through what’s new to help understand where the Codec is in its development, who is involved and how it’s going to achieve its aims. Covering also licenseing

There’s a lot of work to do, but anyone who has an interest in Codecs should take some time to understand the work which is going on.

Watch now!

Speaker

Christian Feldmann Christian Feldmann
Codec Engineer,
Bitmovin