Video: Deep Neural Networks for Video Coding

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and related technologies aren’t going to go away…the real question is where they are best put to use. Here, Dan Grois from Comcast shows their transformative effect on video.

Some of us can have a passable attempt at explaining what neural networks, but to start to understand how this technology works understanding how our neural networks work is important and this is where Dan starts his talk. By walking us through the workings of our own bodies, he explains how we can get computers to mimic parts of this process. This all starts by creating a single neuron but Dan explains multi-layer perception by networking many together.

As we see examples of what these networks are able to do, piece by piece, we start to see how these can be applied to video. These techniques can be applied to many parts of the HEVC encoding process. For instance, extrapolating multiple reference frames, generating interpolation filters, predicting variations etc. Doing this we can achieve a 10% encoding improvements. Indeed, a Deep Neural Network (DNN) can totally replace the DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform) widely used in MPEG and beyond. Upsampling and downsampling can also be significantly improved – something that has already been successfully demonstrated in the market.

Dan isn’t shy of tackling the reason we haven’t seen the above gains widely in use; those of memory requirements and high computational costs. But this work is foundational in ensuring that these issues are overcome at the earliest opportunity and in optimising the approach to implementing them to the best extent possible to day.

The last part of the talk is an interesting look at the logical conclusion of this technology.

Watch now!

Speaker

Dan Grois Dan Grois
Principal Researcher
Comcast

Video: HEVC/H.265 Video Coding Standard

HEVC, also known as H.265 is often discussed even many years after its initial release fro MPEG with some saying that people aren’t using it and others saying its gaining traction. In reality, both sides have a point. Increasingly HEVC is being adopted partly because of wider implementation in products and partly because of a continued push toward higher resolution video which often gives the opportunity to make a clean break from AVC/H.264/MPEG 4.

This expert-led talk looks in detail at HEVC and how it’s constructed. For some, the initial part of the video will be enough. Others will want to bookmark the video to use as reference in their work, whilst still others will want to watch the whole things and will immediately find it puts parts of their work in better context.

Wherever you fit, I think you’ll agree this is a great resource for understanding HEVC streams enabling you to better troubleshoot problems.

Watch now!

Speakers

David Marpe David Marpe
Head of Department Video Coding & Analytics,
Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute
Karsten Suehring Karsten Suehring
Project Manager,
Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute
Benjamin Bross Benjamin Bross
Project Manager,
Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute
Dan Grois Dan Grois
Former Senior Researcher,
Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute