Video: Understanding esports production

Esports is here to stay and brings a new dimension on big events which combine the usual challenges of producing and broadcasting events at scale with less usual challenges such as non-standard resolutions and frame rates. This session from the IBC 2019 conference looks at the reality of bringing such events to life.

The talk starts with a brief introduction to some Esports-only terms before heading into the discussions starting with Simon Eicher who talks about his switch toward typical broadcast tools for Esports which has helped drive better production values and story telling. Maxwell Trauss from Riot Games explains how they incubated a group of great producers and were able keep production values high by having them working on shows remotely worldwide.

Blizzard uses the technique of using a clean ‘world feed’ which is shared worldwide for regions to regionalise it with graphics and language before then broadcasting this to the world. In terms of creating better storytelling, Blizzard have their own software which interprets the game data and presents it in a more consumable way to the production staff.

Observers are people who control in-game cameras. A producer can call out to any one of the observers. The panel talks about how separating the players from the observers from the crowd allows them to change the delay between what’s happening in the game and each of these elements seeing it. At the beginning of the event, this creates the opportunity to move the crowd backwards in time so that players don’t get tipped off. Similarly they can be isolated from the observers for the same effect. However, by the end of the game, the delays have been changed to bring everyone back into present time for a tense finale.

Corey Smith from Blizzard explains the cloud setup including clean feeds where GFX is added in the cloud. This would lead to a single clean feed from the venue, in the end. ESL, on the other hand choose to create their streams locally.

Ryan Chaply from Twitch explains their engagement models some of which reward for watching. Twitch’s real-time chat banner also changes the way productions are made because the producers have direct feedback from the viewers. This leads, day by day, to tweaks to the formats where a production may stop doing a certain thing by day three if it’s not well received, conversely when something is a hit, they can capitalise on this.

Ryan also talks about what they are weighing up in terms of when they will start using UHD. Riot’s Maxwell mentions the question of whether fans really want 4K at the moment, acknowledging it’s an inevitability, he asks whether the priority is actually having more/better stats.

The panel finishes with a look to the future, the continued adoption of broadcast into Esports, timing in the cloud and dealing with end-to-end metadata and a video giving a taste of the Esports event.

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Speakers

Simon Eicher Simon Eicher
Executive Producer, Director of Broadcast, eSports Services,
ESL
Ryan Chaply Ryan Chaply
Senior Esports Program Manager,
Twitch
Corey Smith Corey Smith
Director, Live Operations Broadcast Technology Group,
Blizzard
Maxwell Trauss Maxwell Trauss
Broadcast Architect,
Riot Games
Jens Fischer Jens Fischer
Global Esport Specialist and Account Manager D.A.CH,
EVS

Video: IBC Tech Talks – AI in Production

However it’s applied in our industry, AI is here to stay. In the area of production it is set to revolutionise working practice, by dispensing with many formulaic and repetitive tasks, and making more effective use of human creative skills. Nowhere is this more significant than in live broadcasting where the economic advantages of AI can allow the coverage of events which would not otherwise be cost-effective. In these Tech Talks three industry experts will describe and demonstrate the latest ideas and technologies in AI-assisted production, including one who will address the storytelling benefits for live football. Another international broadcaster will introduce the concept of smart production, where hardly anything is left to the human – even the script is generated automatically by mining information from sources such as social media.

A thought provoking glimpse of how AI researchers see the future of production.

Speakers:

Craig Wright Craig Wright
Project Research Engineer
BBC
Joost de Wit Joost de Wit
Founder & CPO
Media Distillery
Hiroyuki Kaneko Hiroyuki Kaneko
Senior manager
NHK
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Pam Fisher
Pam Fisher
Executive Director
The Media Institute

Video: Next Generation Sports Broadcast Workflows that Expand the Value of Live Production

In this webinar, learn what challenges there are in today’s production and how EVS has teamed up with Aspera at major international sporting events to build Cloud-based production workflows that connect live content with production teams, accredited teams and final viewers. Also discussed is how next generation sports broadcasting workflows are transforming the digital media supply chain.

Speakers

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Webinar: How to Produce and Broadcast Live TV-Style Coverage


Date: July 26th, 2018. 11AM PDT / 2PM EDT / 19:00 BST.

However you produce your video content, if you are not a commercial broadcaster, get some tips and fresh ideas from this webinar.

Learn the production and technical requirements necessary for broadcasting live structured programming from a physical event including: breaking news, industry panels, interviews, event highlights, and behind-the-scenes footage.

Register Now!