Video: High Dynamic Range in AV1

Google and University of Warwick explain AV1, its current status and how its can support HDR with WMG’s trueDR at the IABM’s Future Trends Theatre at IBC 2018.

Matt Frost from Chrome Media takes the stage first giving an overview of AV1’s goals, objective quality tests and where we are in AV1’s timeline as well as answering many questions from the audience.

Next Alan Chalmers from University of Warwick explains how they added HLG, HDR10 (PQ) to AV1. Also added are new, scene-referenced, HDR methods which Alan explains the works of and reasons for.

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Speakers

Alan Chalmers Alan Chalmers
Professor
WMG & trueDR, University of Warwick
Matt Frost Matt Frost
Director, Product Management,
Google Chrome Media

Video: x265 – An Update

From VideoLAN’s Video Dev Days event 2018, this talk discusses the latest updates to x265, a free software library and application for encoding video streams into the H.265/MPEG-H HEVC compression format, released under GNU GPL.

Pradeep Ramachandran, Principal Engineer at Multicore takes us through:

  • The highlights of the last year
  • HDR Encoding
  • AVX-512 optimisation
  • ABR Streaming Improvements
  • Chunked Encoding Support
  • Improving the footprint of x265

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Video: HDR & Wide Color Gamut

A recorded webinar from Axon CTO, Peter Schut about HDR and Wide Colour Gamut (WCG) covering

  • The basics
  • What’s the difference between HDR and WCG?
  • CIE colour charts
  • Puzzling things
  • Surprising things
  • Standards
  • Curves and Look Up Tables (LUTs)

Peter Schut

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Video: Lights, Colors, Artwork


Mark Watson from Netflix examines how to combine SDR and HDR video from many sources into one seamless experience. How do you manage the different colour spaces, the difference in dynamic range, the types of HDR? Mark talks about how the different delivery formats differ and presents ways in which they can be unified, representing the work that Netflix is putting in to create a rich, seamless and dynamic auto-playing user experience.

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Webinar: HDR – Bright prospects ahead, but where are we now?


Time: 15:00 BST, Wednesday June 13th 2018

A review of current technology and real-world deployments

  • The WOW factor: Why HDR?
  • HDR standards: HLG, PQ or HDR10 variants?
  • Content availability: HD or UHD?
  • Consumer displays: Mobile phones or 4K/8K TV?
  • HDR distribution: Broadcast, OTT or 4G/5G?
  • Real world deployments

The competition for viewers’ eyeballs and their disposable income has never been fiercer. Great picture quality is one weapon that service providers – especially broadcasters – can deploy to attract and retain viewers.

It’s true that millions of 4K ready TVs have been sold, but in practice most TVs sold before 2017 don’t have any support for HDR at all. Many different variants of HDR have also emerged in an attempt to offer higher quality coupled with some backwards compatibility with those early TVs, but broadcasters have been perhaps understandably reluctant to commit to producing 4K or HDR content with the costs of the ill-fated 3DTV still on their books.

This webinar looks at HDR in general and the different variants that have emerged. The drive for 4K, or even 8K, content and displays is contrasted with consumers’ willingness to watch full HD with HDR on the latest mobile phone displays…
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Speakers:

David Smith
Technology Manager
Rohde & Schwarz

Andy Quested
Technology Strategy & Architecture
BBC Design + Engineering

Paul Clennell
Chief Technology Officer
dock10

Meeting: Are Existing Broadcast Formats Suitable for HDR WCG Content?


Date: Thursday November 30, 2017 – Ample Refreshments from 18:15 GMT for 19:00 start.
Location: Ericsson Television, Strategic Park, Comines Way, Hedge End, Southampton, SO30 4DA. Google Maps

With higher resolution, wider colour gamut and extended dynamic range, the new Ultra High Definition TV (UHD) standards define a container which allows content creators to offer the consumer a much more immersive visual experience. However there are some artefacts noted within the container particularly around HDR material. Olie Bauman outlines why YCrCb are used and the human vision systems response to changes in chroma/luminance and the correlation between R, G and B

As HDR and WCG expand the Colour Volumes he will show why these increased from SD (601) to HD (709) to UHD (2020) and show the difference between PQ (Display Referred) and HLG (Scene Referred) workflows

From this background he will show examples of artefacts due to chroma down-sampling and show the different characteristics – depending on work flow.

He highlights that the problems will become greater as more content exploiting the full UHD container becomes available, requiring additional care and processing in content production and delivery.

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On-Demand: DVB UHD HDR Webinar


On-Demand Webinar

DVB recently updated its audio-visual coding specification, adding support for High Dynamic Range (HDR), Higher Frame Rates (HFR) and Next Generation Audio (NGA). You can now learn all about the new features in a webinar by the editor of this impressive specification, Virginie Drugeon (Panasonic) on January 18th, 2017. The webinar and Q&A time should take around 1 hour. You can send your questions by the Webex chat function during the webinar and questions will be answered in a few blocks during the webinar.

The specification update has been published as BlueBook A157 and will be passed to ETSI for formal publication as TS 101 154 v2.3.1.

High Dynamic Range (HDR) significantly increases the contrast ratio and results in pictures with more ‘sparkle’. The DVB HDR solution supports Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) and Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) transfer functions. Furthermore, the new specification defines Higher Frame Rates (HFR), offering sharper images of moving objects by going beyond the current 50/60 frames per second. When it comes to audio, DVB has added the latest Next Generation Audio (NGA) schemes to provide immersive and personalized audio content using object- or scene-based coding.

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