Video: The ST 2094 Standards Suite For Dynamic Metadata

Lars Borg explains to us what problems the SMPTE ST 2094 standard sets out to solve. Looking at the different types of HDR and Wide Colour Gamut (WCG) we quickly see how many permutations there are and how many ways there are to get it wrong.

ST 2094 carries the metadata needed to manage the colour, dynamic range and related data. In order to understand what’s needed, Lars takes us through the details of the HDR implementations, touching on workflows and explaining how the ability of your display affects the video.

We then look at midtones and dynamic metadata before a Q&A.

This talk is very valuable in understanding the whole HDR, WCG ecosystem as much as it is ST 2094.

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Speaker

Lars Borg Lars Borg
Principal Scientist,
Adobe

Video: Content Production Technology on Hybrid Log-Gamma


‘Better Pixels’ is the continuing refrain from the large number of people who are dissatisfied with simply increasing resolution to 4K or even 8K. Why can’t we have a higher frame-rate instead? Why not give us a wider colour gamut (WCG)? And why not give us a higher dynamic range (HDR)? Often, they would prefer any of these 3 options over higher resolution.

Watch this video explain more, now.

Dynamic Range is the word given to describe how much of a difference there is between the smallest possible signal and the strongest possible signal. In audio, what’s the quietest things that can be heard verses the loudest thing that can be heard (without distortion). In video, what’s the difference between black and white – after all, can your TV fully simulate the brightness and power of our sun? No, what about your car’s headlights? Probably not. Can your TV go as bright as your phone flashlight – well, now that’s realistic.

So let’s say your TV can go from a very dark black to being as bright as a medium-power flashlight, what about the video that you send your TV? When there’s a white frame, do you want your TV blasting as bright as it can? HDR allows producers to control the brightness of your display device so that something that is genuinely very bright, like star, a bright light, an explosion can be represented very brightly, whereas something which is simply white, can have the right colour, but also be medium brightness. With video which is Standard Dynamic Range (SDR), there isn’t this level of control.

For films, HDR is extremely useful, but for sports too – who’s not seen a football game where the sun leaves half the pitch in shadow and half in bright sunlight? With SDR, there’s no choice but to have one half either very dark or very bright (mostly white) so you can’t actually see the game there. HDR enabled the production crew to let HDR TVs show detail in both areas of the pitch.

HLG, which stands for Hybrid Log-Gamma is the name of a way of delivering HDR video. It’s been pioneered, famously, by Japan’s NHK with the UK’s BBC and has been standardised as ARIB STV-B67. In this talk, NHK’s Yuji Nagata helps us navigate working with multiple formats; HDR HLG -> SDR, plus converting from HLG to Dolby’s HDR format called PQ.

The reality of broadcasting is that anyone who is producing a programme in HDR will have to create an SDR version at some point. The question is how to do that and when. For live, some broadcasters may need to fully automate this. In this talk, we look at a semi-automated way of doing this.

HDR is usually delivered in a Wide Colour Gamut signal such as the ITU’s BT.2020. Converting between this colour space and the more common BT.709 colour space which is part of the HD video standards, is also needed on top of the dynamic range conversion. So listen to Yugi Nagata’s talk to find out NHK’s approach to this.

NHK has pushed very hard for many years to make 8K broadcasts feasible and has in recent times focussed on tooling up in time for the the 2020 Olympics. This talk was given at the SMPTE 2017 technical conference, but is all the more relevant now as NHK up the number of 8K broadcasts approaching the opening ceremony. This work on HDR and WCG is part of making sure that the 8K format really delivers an impressive and immersive experience for those that are lucky enough to experience it. This work on the video goes hand in hand with their tireless work with audio which can deliver 22.2 multichannel surround.

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Speaker

Yuji Nagata Yuji Nagata
Broadcast Engineer,
NHK

Video: High Dynamic Range in AV1

Google and University of Warwick explain AV1, its current status and how its can support HDR with WMG’s trueDR at the IABM’s Future Trends Theatre at IBC 2018.

Matt Frost from Chrome Media takes the stage first giving an overview of AV1’s goals, objective quality tests and where we are in AV1’s timeline as well as answering many questions from the audience.

Next Alan Chalmers from University of Warwick explains how they added HLG, HDR10 (PQ) to AV1. Also added are new, scene-referenced, HDR methods which Alan explains the works of and reasons for.

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Speakers

Alan Chalmers Alan Chalmers
Professor
WMG & trueDR, University of Warwick
Matt Frost Matt Frost
Director, Product Management,
Google Chrome Media

Video: x265 – An Update

From VideoLAN’s Video Dev Days event 2018, this talk discusses the latest updates to x265, a free software library and application for encoding video streams into the H.265/MPEG-H HEVC compression format, released under GNU GPL.

Pradeep Ramachandran, Principal Engineer at Multicore takes us through:

  • The highlights of the last year
  • HDR Encoding
  • AVX-512 optimisation
  • ABR Streaming Improvements
  • Chunked Encoding Support
  • Improving the footprint of x265

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