Video: Tech Talk: Production case studies – the gain after the pain

Technology has always been harnessed to improve, change and reinvent production. Automated cameras, LED walls, AR, LED lighting among many other technologies have all enabled productions to be done differently creating new styles and even types of programming.

In this Tech Talk from IBC 2019, we look at disruptive new technologies that change production, explained by the people who are implementing them and pushing the methods forward.

TV2 Norway’s Kjell Ove Skarsbø explains how they have developed a complete IP production flow and playout facility. This system allows them more flexibility and scalability. They did this by creating their own ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) to decouple the equipment from direct integrations. Working in an agile fashion, they delivered incremental improvements. This means that Provys, Mayam, Viz, Mediator amongst other equipment communicate with each other by delivering messages in to a system framework which passes messages on their behalf in a standard format.

Importantly, Kjell shares with us some mistakes that were made on the way. For instance, the difficulties of the size of the project, the importance of programmers understanding broadcast. “Make no compromise” is one of the lessons learnt which he discusses.

Olie Baumann from MediaKind presents live 360º video delivery, “Experiences that people have in VR embed themselves more like memories than experiences like television” he explains. Olie starts. by explaining the lay of the land in today’s VR equipment landscape then looking at some of the applications of 360º video such as looking around from an on-car camera in racing.

Olie talks us through a case study where he worked with Tiledmedia to deliver an 8K viewport which is delivered in full resolution only in the direction the 360º viewer and a lower resolution for the rest. When moving your head, the area in full resolution moves to match. We then look through the system diagram to understand which parts are in the cloud and what happens.

Matthew Brooks with Thomas Preece from BBC R&D explain their work in taking Object-based media from the research environment into mainstream production. This work allows productions to deliver object-based media meaning that the receiving device can display the objects in the best way for the display. In today’s world of second screens, screen sizes vary and small screens can benefit from larger, or less, text. It also allows for interactivity where programmes fork and can adapt to the viewers tastes, opinions and/or choices. Finally, they have delivered a tool to help productions manage this themselves and they can even make a linear version of the programme to maximise the value gained out of the time and effort spent in creating these unique productions.

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Speakers

Kjell Ove Skarsbø Kjell Ove Skarsbø
Chief Technology Architect,
TV2 Norway
Olie Baumann Olie Baumann
Senior Technical Specialist,
MediaKind
Matthew Brooks Matthew Brooks
Lead Engineer,
BBC Research & Development
Thomas Preece Thomas Preece
Research Engineer,
BBC Research & Development
Stephan Heimbecher

Video: AMWA BCP 003 NMOS API Security

Building security into your infrastructure is more and more important for broadcasters with many now taking very seriously a topic which, only 6 years ago, was only just being discussed. Attacks on broadcasters like TV5 Monde have brought into focus that it’s not just copmanies who have high value rights who are ripe for breach – attacking a broadcaster is a high impact way of getting your message accross.

We have seen how the internet, which was built on very open and trusting protocols, has struggled in recent times to keep abuse to a minimum and to implement security to keep data safe and to keep out unauthorised persons.

And so AMWA is looking at its recent specifcations to ensure there is a clear and interoperable way of implementing security. The benefit of IP should be that that as an industry we can benefit from the work of other industries before us and here, having based these specifications on HTTP interfaces, we can do exactly that. Just like sites on the internet can implemnt HTTPS, we, too use the same mechanism of security certificates and TLS (colloquially known as SSL) encryption to ensure that not only is our data encrypted but also that no one can impersonate anyone else on the network.

Simon Rankine from BBC R&D explains the work he has been part of in defining this secure interface which not only protects from mal-intentioned actors, but also offers some protection from accidental mistakes by staff.

Simon gives a good intorduction to not only how this is a benefit but also how the underlying mechanisms work which are just as applicable to the NMOS APIs as they are to general websites.

Speaker

Simon Rankine
Simon Rankine
Project Research Engineer,
BBC R&D

Video: Securing NMOS Apps

The still-growing NMOS suite of specifications from AMWA defines ways in which your IP network can find and register new devices plugged in to it (e.g. camera, microphone etc.), manage their connections and control them. They fit neatly along side the SMPTE ST 2110 suite of standards which define the way that the essences (video, audio, metadata) are sent over networks intended for professional media.

As such, they are core to a network and as the market for uncompressed media products matures, the attention is on the details such as whether they scale and security.

In this talk, Simon Rankine from BBC R&D starts by explaining the objectives which means looking at the different aspects of security which is split into three; securing data transfer, ensuring data goes to the right place, ensuring only authorised people can act.

TLS, standing for Transport Layer Security, is the same protocol used for secure websites; those which start with https://. It is also referred to by the name of the protocol it replaced, SSL. Given the NMOS APIs are sent over HTTP, TLS is a perfect match for the use case. TLS provides not only the ability to encrypt the connection but also provides the basis for certificate exchange which allows us trust that the data is being sent to the right place. Simon then covers ciphers and TLS versions before talking about certificate management.

This talk was given at the IP Showcase at NAB 2019.

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Speaker

Simon Rankine Simon Rankine
Research Engineer,
BBC R&D

Video: Sky Tech Summit, Redefining the visual experience – advances in UHD & HDR

From Sky’s 2018 Tech Summit, we hear from across the industry about the activities the industry is engaged in to improve television and move it into the future.

Chris Johns, from Sky, starts by walking us through the current advances in TV; delivery methods, choice, and advances in video and audio.

Ian Nock from the UltraHD Forum, gives us the low-down on where UHD displays are heading, the inter-op work being spearheaded by the UHD Forum and specifications being agreed to bring technologies like HDR and Dolby Atmos into our homes.

Carys Hughes from Sky, explains her work ensuring that lip sync keeps pace with recent technology and remains at 0ms.

Phil Layton from BBC R&D takes us through the live UHD events the BBC has been doing, showing us how they have been steaming live.

Gill Reston also explains what the DPP has been doing in the industry particularly with IMF.

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Speakers

Chris Johns Chris Johns
Chief Engineer, Broadcast Strategy,
Sky UK
Ian Nock Ian Nock
Chair of the Ultra HD Forum Interop-WG
Founder of Fairmile West
Carys Hughes Carys Hughes
Design Engineer (Emerging Technologies)
Sky
Phil Layton Phil Layton
Head of Broadcast & Connected Systems,
BBC Research & Development
Gill Reston Jill Reston
Senior Project Manager,
DPP