Video: Securing NMOS Apps

The still-growing NMOS suite of specifications from AMWA defines ways in which your IP network can find and register new devices plugged in to it (e.g. camera, microphone etc.), manage their connections and control them. They fit neatly along side the SMPTE ST 2110 suite of standards which define the way that the essences (video, audio, metadata) are sent over networks intended for professional media.

As such, they are core to a network and as the market for uncompressed media products matures, the attention is on the details such as whether they scale and security.

In this talk, Simon Rankine from BBC R&D starts by explaining the objectives which means looking at the different aspects of security which is split into three; securing data transfer, ensuring data goes to the right place, ensuring only authorised people can act.

TLS, standing for Transport Layer Security, is the same protocol used for secure websites; those which start with https://. It is also referred to by the name of the protocol it replaced, SSL. Given the NMOS APIs are sent over HTTP, TLS is a perfect match for the use case. TLS provides not only the ability to encrypt the connection but also provides the basis for certificate exchange which allows us trust that the data is being sent to the right place. Simon then covers ciphers and TLS versions before talking about certificate management.

This talk was given at the IP Showcase at NAB 2019.

Watch now!

Speaker

Simon Rankine Simon Rankine
Research Engineer,
BBC R&D

Webinar: Next Generation Audio & DVB

Webinar Date: 18th March 2019
Time: 14:00 GMT / 15:00 CET

Object oriented audio is a relatively new audio technique which doesn’t simply send audio as one track or two, but it sends individual audio objects – simplistically we can think of these as audio samples – which also come with some position information.

With non-object-orientated audio, there is very little a speaker system can do to adjust the audio to match. It was either created for 8 speakers, 6, or 2 etc. So if you have a system that only has 4 speakers or they are in unusual places, it’s a compromise to it sound right.

Object oriented audio sends the position information for some of the audio which means that the decoder can work out how much of the sound to put in each speaker to best represent that sound for whatever room and speaker set-up it has.

AC-4 from Dolby is one technology which allows objects to be sent with the audio. It still supports conventional 5.1 style sound but can also contain up to 7 audio objects. AC-4 is one NGA technology adopted by DVB for DASH.

In this webinar, Simon Tuff from the BBC discusses what the Audio Video Coding (AVC) experts of DVB have been working on to introduce Next Generation Audio (NGA) to the DVB specifications over recent years. With the latest version of TS 101 154, DVB’s guidelines for the use of video and audio coding in broadcast and broadband applications, being published by ETSI, it seems like a great time to unpack the audio part of the tool box and share the capabilities of NGA via a webinar.

No registration needed. Click here to watch on the day.

Speaker

Simon Tuff Simon Tuff
Principal Technologist
BBC

Video: AMWA NMOS State of Play

With all the talk of the SMPTE ST 2110 standards suite, it’s sometimes forgotten that it only deals with content. If you want a working system, you’ll need to do a few more things – find new devices on the network, work out what they can do, control them, guarantee the bandwidth and often deal with metadata that arrives separately like tallies.

This is what the AMWA NMOS specifications do. Peter Brightwell and Thomas Edwards have been heavily involved in creating them and in this video lead us through what each one does and how they are used.

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Speakers

Peter Brightwell Peter Brightwell
Lead Engineer,
BBC R&D
Thomas Edwards Thomas Edwards
VP Engineering & Development
Fox NEO

Video: Building and Moving Live Broadcasting to AWS

Learn how the BBC and Nine Network have enhanced the user experience and created new business models and opportunities, giving audiences more choices with more features, all while maintaining broadcast-grade service. When your business is providing live content to viewers, you know that there are no second chances. Audiences have come to expect a faultless live broadcast, and providers know they must ensure reliability with failover and redundancy plans. Learn how migrating to the cloud offers a new way to architect live-streaming workflows while maintaining the highest standards of resilience.

Watch now!

Speakers

Mike Callahan Mike Callahan
Sr. Director Solutions Marketing,
Amazon Web Services
Kunaal Ramchandani Kunaal Ramchandani,
Digital Development Director, 
Nine Entertainment Co.
LLoyd Wallis Lloyd Wallis
Senior Engineer
British Broadcasting Corporation