Video: 5G Technology

5G seems to offer so much, but there is a lot of nuance under the headlines. Which of the features will telcos actually provide? When will the spectrum become available? How will we cope with the new levels of complexity? Whilst for many 5G will simply ‘work’, when broadcasters look to use it for delivering programming, they need to look a few levels deeper.

In this wide-ranging video from the SMPTE Toronto Section, four speakers take us through the technologies at play and they ways they can be implemented to cut through the hype and help us understand what could actually be achieved, in time, using 5G technology.

Michael J Martin is first up who covers topics such as spectrum use, modulation, types of cells, beam forming and security. Regarding spectrum, Michael explains that 5G uses three frequency bands, the sub 1GHz spectrum that’s been in use for many years, a 3Ghz range and a millimetre range at 26Ghz.

“It’s going to be at least a decade until we get 5G as wonderful as 4G is today.”

Michael J Martin
Note that some countries already use other frequencies such as 1.8GHz which will also be available.The important issue is that the 26Ghz spectrum will typically not be available for over a year, so 5G roll-out starts in some of the existing bands or in the 3.4Ghz spectrum. A recurring theme in digital RF is the use of OFDM which has long been used by DVB and has been adopted by ATSC 3.0 as their modulation, too. OFDM allows different levels of robustness so you can optimise reach and bandwidth.

Michael highlights a problem faced in upgrading infrastructure to 5G, the amount of towers/sites and engineer availability. It’s simply going to take a long time to upgrade them all even in a small, dense environment. This will deal with the upgrade of existing large sites, but 5G provides also for smaller cells, (micro, pico and femto cells). These small cells are very important in delivering the millimetre wavelength part of the spectrum.

Network Slicing
Source: Michael J. Martin, MICAN Communications

We look at MIMO and beam forming next. MIMO is an important technology as it, effectively, collects reflected versions of the transmitted signals and processes them to create stronger reception. 5G uses MIMO in combination with beam forming where the transmitter itself electronically manipulates the transmitter array to focus the transmission and localise it to a specific receiver/number of receivers.

Lastly, Michael talks about Network Slicing which is possibly one of the most anticipated features of 5G by the broadcast community. The idea being that the broadcaster can reserve its own slice of spectrum so when sharing an environment with 30,000 other receivers, they will still have the bandwidth they need.

Our next speaker is Craig Snow from Huawei outlines how secondary networks can be created for companies for private use which, interestingly, partly uses separate frequencies from public network. Network slicing can be used to separate your enterprise 5G network into separate networks fro production, IT support etc. Craig then looks at the whole broadcast chain and shows where 5G can be used and we quickly see that there are many uses in live production as well as in distribution. This can also mean that remote production becomes more practical for some use cases.

Craig moves on to look at physical transmitter options showing a range of sub 1Kg transmitters, many of which have in-built Wi-Fi, and then shows how external microwave backhaul might look for a number of your buildings in a local area connecting back to a central tower.

Next is Sayan Sivanathan who works for Bell Mobility and goes in to more detail regarding the wider range of use cases for 5G. Starting by comparing it to 4G, highlighting the increased data rates, improved spectrum efficiency and connection density of devices, he paints a rosy picture of the future. All of these factors support use cases such as remote control and telemetry from automated vehicles (whether in industrial or public settings.)  Sayan then looks at the deployment status in the US, Europe and Korea. He shows the timeline for spectrum auction in Canada, talks through photos of  5G transmitters in the real world.

Global Mobile Data Traffic (Exabytes per month)
Source: Ericsson Mobility Report, Nov 2019

Finishing off today’s session is Tony Jones from MediaKind who focuses in on which 5G features are going to be useful for Media and Entertainment. One is ‘better video on mobile’. Tony picks up on a topic mentioned by Michael at the beginning of the video: processing at the edge. Edge processing, meaning having compute power at the closest point of the network to your end user allows you to deliver customised manifest and deal with rights management with minimal latency.

Tony explains how MediaKind worked with Intel and Ericsson to deliver 5G remote production for the 2018 US Open. 5G is often seen as a great way to make covering golf cheaper, more aesthetically pleasing and also quicker to rig.

The session ends with a Q&A

Watch now!
Speakers

Michael J Martin Michael J Martin
MICAN Communications
Blog: vividcomm.com
Tony Jones Tony Jones
Principal Technologist
MediaKind Global
Craig Snow Craig Snow
Enterprise Accounts Director,
Huawei
Sayan Sivanathan Sayan Sivanathan
Senior Manager – IoT, Smart Cities & 5G Business Development
Bell Mobility

Video: Tech Talk: Production case studies – the gain after the pain

Technology has always been harnessed to improve, change and reinvent production. Automated cameras, LED walls, AR, LED lighting among many other technologies have all enabled productions to be done differently creating new styles and even types of programming.

In this Tech Talk from IBC 2019, we look at disruptive new technologies that change production, explained by the people who are implementing them and pushing the methods forward.

TV2 Norway’s Kjell Ove Skarsbø explains how they have developed a complete IP production flow and playout facility. This system allows them more flexibility and scalability. They did this by creating their own ESB (Enterprise Service Bus) to decouple the equipment from direct integrations. Working in an agile fashion, they delivered incremental improvements. This means that Provys, Mayam, Viz, Mediator amongst other equipment communicate with each other by delivering messages in to a system framework which passes messages on their behalf in a standard format.

Importantly, Kjell shares with us some mistakes that were made on the way. For instance, the difficulties of the size of the project, the importance of programmers understanding broadcast. “Make no compromise” is one of the lessons learnt which he discusses.

Olie Baumann from MediaKind presents live 360º video delivery, “Experiences that people have in VR embed themselves more like memories than experiences like television” he explains. Olie starts. by explaining the lay of the land in today’s VR equipment landscape then looking at some of the applications of 360º video such as looking around from an on-car camera in racing.

Olie talks us through a case study where he worked with Tiledmedia to deliver an 8K viewport which is delivered in full resolution only in the direction the 360º viewer and a lower resolution for the rest. When moving your head, the area in full resolution moves to match. We then look through the system diagram to understand which parts are in the cloud and what happens.

Matthew Brooks with Thomas Preece from BBC R&D explain their work in taking Object-based media from the research environment into mainstream production. This work allows productions to deliver object-based media meaning that the receiving device can display the objects in the best way for the display. In today’s world of second screens, screen sizes vary and small screens can benefit from larger, or less, text. It also allows for interactivity where programmes fork and can adapt to the viewers tastes, opinions and/or choices. Finally, they have delivered a tool to help productions manage this themselves and they can even make a linear version of the programme to maximise the value gained out of the time and effort spent in creating these unique productions.

Watch now!

Watch now!
Speakers

Kjell Ove Skarsbø Kjell Ove Skarsbø
Chief Technology Architect,
TV2 Norway
Olie Baumann Olie Baumann
Senior Technical Specialist,
MediaKind
Matthew Brooks Matthew Brooks
Lead Engineer,
BBC Research & Development
Thomas Preece Thomas Preece
Research Engineer,
BBC Research & Development
Stephan Heimbecher

Video: Analysis of emerging video codecs: coding tools, compression efficiency and complexity

There continues to be fervent activity in codec development and it’s widely expected that there won’t be a single successor to AVC (h.264). Vying for one of the spots is AV1 but also MPEG’s VVC.

In this talk at SMPTE 2018, Julien Le Tanou from MediaKind compares the coding tools used by VVC and AV1 and explains the methodology he uses to compare the two codecs. We see the increase in decoding time compared to HEVC required for VVC as well as the famously slow AV1. We also see the bitrate savings with VVC performing better.

Julien also presents subjective results which are not correlated to the objective results and explains reasons for this.

Speakers

Julien Le Tanou Julien Le Tanou
Senior Engineer, Video Compression,
MediaKind

Video: OTT Moves Toward Microservices


 

Using microservices is a way of architecting your software platform to be nimble, simple and is just as applicable to on-premise platforms as cloud. As scaling is important for OTT providers, it’s not surprising that much work is being done in the OTT sector to utilise microservice architectures.

Even companies that are not yet actively operating on a microservices architecture are looking for vendors who at least have a strategy to cater to it for the future. This session will examine the core benefits (including redundancy, dev ops, scalability, and self-healing), the different approaches (including containerisation and orchestration via Docker, Kubernetes, and Mesos, as well as native microservices models like Erlang), and the complexities of migrating a generic architecture to a microservices architecture.

This panel covers:

    • Why is OTT so suited to microservices?
    • How microservices enable companies to be flexible to changing customer demands
    • How microservices reduce complexity
    • Benefits of continuous deployment

plus much more!

Watch now!

Moderator: Dom Robinson, Director and Creative Firestarter – id3as, UK & Contributing Editor, StreamingMedia.com, UK
Stefan Lederer, CEO & Co-Founder – Bitmovin, USA
Steve Miller-Jones, Vice President of Product Strategy – Limelight Networks, UK
Xiaomei Lio, Senior Software Engineer, Netflix
Mark Russell, Chief Technology & Strategy Officer, MediaKind
Olivier Karra, Directory of OTT & IPTV Solutions, Marketing, Harmonic Inc.