Video: The future of addressable TV advertising in the UK

When it comes to advertising, there’s a lot of value in understanding who you’re talking to. This video examines the practicality of that within the UK and the relative value that brings. Nigel Walley from Decipher looks at how the landscape is changing both in the ability to address the TV externally and the information available within the home.

Nigel starts by looking at how the broadcast TV companies and the online streaming companies are able to target and concludes that broadcast can often fine tune to the region and and include dayparting whereas though we assume streaming companies can target by individuals, in reality Nigel asserts, they typically target by household. He goes further to explain that almost 50% of viewing is still linear TV with YouTube taking up 12.4% of the 50% which remains of the 4hours and 42 minutes of average viewing time per day.

Nigel makes the point that with HbbTV and many of the streaming services being available on the ‘big screen’, it makes the idea of ‘broadcast’ vs ‘streaming’ a nonsense as they are already converged. The big difference is in how we can provide the ads to these platforms. The Virgin and Sky closed platforms comprise nearly 13 million viewers with Freeview plus others making up nearly 16 million. Nigel highlights that 30% of viewing is with the BBC and hence no advertising, although trailers may be delivered using addressable technologies.

Nigel explains that Sky’s Adsmart has been extended to Virgin cable. Then explains how YouView and other channels move up to the big screen – the TV. The important issue for publishers is how the Sky and Virgin platforms end up as controlling influences. Nigel explains the Linear Addressability of the platforms showing that YouView is the next potential area this will happen. There’s also the opportunity for smart TVs themselves to help in delivering these ads. “What can a broadcaster do alone” asks Nigel which he answers by saying ‘very little’ unless they are Sky or Virgin in the UK. They can deliver addressable TV into apps and computers, however.

Nigel finishes with a call to action to the broadcasters to change their focus from individual apps to the ways they and agencies can work together to reach more, and more targeted viewers.

Watch now!
Speaker

Nigel Walley Nigel Walley
Managing Director,
Decipher

Video: Reasons to cry –  living room device app development

HbbTV is a transmission standard seeking to unify over-the-air transmissions and broadband-delivered services into a seamless service. This aim is the same as ATSC 3.0 though the means of achieving it are not the same. HbbTV has seen growing use since its debut in 2006 and is now on its 2nd iteration.

James Williams has spent a lot of time getting services working on HbbTV-compliant hardware. STB manufacturers always have to balance very carefully the cost of the box against the components and hence performance. This leads to some unfortunate compromises when it comes to ‘secondary features’ such as rendering HTML, CSS or Javascript even if they are required in order to validate a box against a standard. This talk is a synthesis of what’s he’s learnt, fought against and endured making, sometimes very simple, things work.

James starts by looking at the boxes available and, importantly, the SDKs behind them which are many and varied. We’re then taken through some of the XML necessary to get an HbbTV app up and running including some key “dos and don’ts”. Now that we’ve seen how to invoke a program, James takes us on an amusing journey into getting a loading spinner to work and the many attempts, all highly reasonable, to convince this to be rendered.

For a video service, playing videos is probably the most important function so next we look at the surprising number of ways one can fail to get video to play using quite rational parameters in MPEG DASH seeing the ways to make it work and the ones to avoid. Finally we see the variety of responses that boxes report back their failure to render video.

A cautionary tale, or a guide to survive? You decide.
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Speaker

James Williams James Williams
Solutions Engineer,
Mux

Video: HbbTV and ATSC 3.0 sees broadcasters striking back

Should HbbTV and ATSC 3.0 be seen as the last flailing attempts for over-the-air broadcasters to remain relevant, or an important step forward in terms of keeping in step with changing viewership? Both technologies enable traditional broadcast to be mixed with internet-based video, entertainment and services as part of one, seamless, experience.

ATSC 3.0 has taken hold in the US and some other countries as a way to deliver digital video within a single traditional VHF channel – and with the latest 3.0 version, this actually moves to broadcasting IP packets over the air. HbbTV, on the other hand, is more commonly found in Europe and Asia with deployments in nearly 40 countries.

ATSC 3.0 is ready for deployment in the US and is now at a turning poin. With a number of successful trials under its belt, it’s now time for the real deployments to start. In this panel discussion as part of the IBC 2019 conference we hear that CES 2020 will be the time to listen out for major ATSC announcements.

The approach to digital TV in most other places, through DVB, is to bring together many broadcasters in to one multiplexed signal. In the initial iterations of DVB-T, broadcasters have banded together under the same name: In the UK and Australia, for instance, it’s ‘Freeview’. So when moving to something like HbbTV, in contrast to the ATSC plan, it’s natural to do the same.

This panel brings together companies who are pushing the technologies forward from the Europe and the US.

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Speakers

Mary Ann Halford Mary Ann Halford
Senior Advisor,
OC & C Strategy Consultants
Richard M. Friedel Richard M. Friedel
Executive Vice President, Technology & Broadcast Strategy,
21st Century Fox
Anne Schelle Anne Schelle
Managing Director,
Pearl
Vincent Grivet Vincent Grivet
Chairman,
HbbTV Association
Oliver Botti Oliver Botti
Head of International Business Development and Innovation,
FINCONS GROUP

Webinar: Implementing broadcaster addressable TV using HbbTV

HbbTV combines over-the-air TV with internet-delivered services which viewers see as a single, seamless service. HbbTV – which stands for Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV – is a standardised way to deliver internet-enhanced over-the-air television to homes.

Date: Tuesday 16th July, 14:00 BST / 15:00 CEST

Now on version 2.0.1, HbbTV has been adopted around the world. The UK has the Freeview Play live and on-demand service based on HbbTV 2.0, delivered over satellite. New Zealand and Australia also have a Freeview-labelled service. Turkey and Saudi Arabia have services on HbbTV and Finland has been on air sine 2013 with HbbTV.

This webinar looks at what’s new in 2.0.1 and focusses on the possibilities of targeted advertising, highlighting the RTL Group’s world first swapping over-the-air ads for internet-delivered adverts.

This webcast will discuss:

  • The benefits of a standards-based ad insertion solution for the TV and device market
  • Market penetration of HbbTV devices that support IP-into-broadcast content substitution, including free-to-air hybrid set-top boxes, smart TVs and connected TV streaming devices
  • Technology capabilities within the HbbTV 2.0.1 standard, including how to implement HbbTV-enabled addressable TV
  • The rationale for including HbbTV ad insertion on devices that already include broadcaster OTT apps
  • Compatibility and interoperability between HbbTV and the broadcast backoffice and associated ad-tech
  • Efforts to include HbbTV ad insertion in the new HbbTV-TA (Targeted Advertising) standard

Register now!

Speakers

Henry Rivero Henry Rivero
VP Advanced Advertising & Innovation,
RTL Group
Frode Hernes Frode Hernes
SVP of Product Management,
Vewd
Leon Siotis Leon Siotis
GM Revenue Europe.
SpotX
John Moulding John Moulding
Editor-in-Chief
VideoNet