Video: ATSC 3.0 Seminar Part III

ATSC 3.0 is the US-developed set of transmission standards which is fully embracing IP technology both over the air and for internet-delivered content. This talk follows on from the previous two talks which looked at the physical and transmission layers. Here we’re seeing how IP throughout has benefits in terms of broadening choice and seamlessly moving from on-demand to live channels.

Richard Chernock is back as our Explainer in Chief for this session. He starts by explaining the driver for the all-IP adoption which focusses on the internet being the source of much media and data. The traditional ATSC 1.0 MPEG Transport Stream island worked well for digital broadcasting but has proven tricky to integrate, though not without some success if you consider HbbTV. Realistically, though, ATSC see that as a stepping stone to the inevitable use of IP everywhere and if we look at DVB-I from DVB Project, we see that the other side of the Atlantic also sees the advantages.

But seamlessly mixing together a broadcaster’s on-demand services with their linear channels is only benefit. Richard highlights multilingual markets where the two main languages can be transmitted (for the US, usually English and Spanish) but other languages can be made available via the internet. This is a win in both directions. With the lower popularity, the internet delivery costs are not overburdening and for the same reason they wouldn’t warrant being included on the main Tx.

Richard introduces ISO BMFF and MPEG DASH which are the foundational technologies for delivering video and audio over ATSC 3.0 and, to Richard’s point, any internet streaming services.

We get an overview of the protocol stack to see where they fit together. Richard explains both MPEG DASH and the ROUTE protocol which allows delivery of data using IP on uni-directional links based on FLUTE.

The use of MPEG DASH allows advertising to become more targeted for the broadcaster. Cable companies, Richard points out, have long been able to swap out an advert in a local area for another and increase their revenue. In recent years companies like Sky in the UK (now part of Comcast) have developed technologies like Adsmart which, even with MPEG TS satellite transmissions can receive internet-delivered targeted ads and play them over the top of the transmitted ads – even when the programme is replayed off disk. Any adopter of ATSC 3.0 can achieve the same which could be part of a business case to make the move.

Another part of the business case is that ATSC not only supports 4K, unlike ATSC 1.0, but also ‘better pixels’. ‘Better pixels’ has long been the way to remind people that TV isn’t just about resolution. ‘Better pixels’ includes ‘next generation audio’ (NGA), HDR, Wide Colour Gamut (WCG) and even higher frame rates. The choice of HEVC Main 10 Profile should allow all of these technologies to be used. Richard makes the point that if you balance the additional bitrate requirement against the likely impact to the viewers, UHD doesn’t make sense compared to, say, enabling HDR.

Richard moves his focus to audio next unpacking the term NGA talking about surround sound and object oriented sound. He notes that renderers are very advanced now and can analyse a room to deliver a surround sound experience without having to place speakers in the exact spot you would normally need. Options are important for sound, not just one 5.1 surround sound track is very important in terms of personalisation which isn’t just choosing language but also covers commentary, audio description etc. Richard says that audio could be delivered in a separate pipe (PLP – discussed previously) such that even after the
video has cut out due to bad reception, the audio continues.

The talk finishes looking at accessibility such as picture-in-picture signing, SMPTE Timed Text captions (IMSC1), security and the ATSC 3.0 standards stack.

Watch now!
Speaker

Richard Chernock Richard Chernock
Former CSO,
Triveni Digital

Video: Harness SSAI’s Superpowers

Server-side Ad Insertion (SSAI) is a great option for streaming services delivering video to a wide variety of devices and for those who need to avoid ad blockers. Whilst ad insertion can happen in the player, this mechanism can be interfered with allowing users to avoid ads. Whilst client-side ad insertion can much more easily create a unique stream for each client, dynamic SSAI can now do the same with a better user experience.

This panel from the OTT Leadership Summit at Streaming Media West 2019 brings together Disney, WarnerMerdia and Crunchyroll to share their experiences with SSAI. They discuss beaconing, ad standards, scaling, SCTE and more.

Beaconing goes hand in hand with ad playback providing metrics on what happened. When you perform certain actions, the player will reach out to a URL. This can be used to indicate such things as users skipping or pausing a video. The beacon information can then be used to verify how much of which ads were seen by whom and charge advertisers accordingly.

The panel moves on to discussing scaling using live sports as an example and cover questions to ask vendors to ensure you and they are ready for maximum scale. Bandwidth, is declared the biggest challenge, but a less obvious problem is that your upstream ad providers can’t always scale well. If you rely on calls from your server to others, then it’s vital to understand their scaling capacity and strategy. They discuss issues with losing beacons when operating at scale and the need for detailed logging and debugging in order to spot errors and reconcile the results.

Some time is next spent on VPAID and VAST 4 which are both messaging specifications to allow ad servers to tell applications which ads to play. The panel discusses the pros and cons in their use for SSAI where the stitcher needs to reach out to and ad server in real time to find out which ads to play.

At the end of the discussion, the panel takes questions from the floor but not before discussing SCTE Markers and ‘content conditioning’ which surrounds taking care of your source videos and encoder such that the two assets fit together properly at I-frame boundaries.

Watch now!
Speakers

Robert Jameson Robert Jameson
Technical Director, Media Enablement
Turner | WarnerMedia
Stephen Gray Stephen Gray
Director, Ad Tech Systems
Walt Disney Direct-to-Consumer & International
Michael Dale Michael Dale
VP Engineering,
Crunchyroll
Nadine Krefetz Nadine Krefetz
Consultant, Reality Software
Contributing Editor, Streaming Media

Webinar: Video Ad Optimisation

Date: 24th October, 2019 Time: 10am PST / 1pm EDT / 18:00 GMT

If there’s one thing that’s been clear throughout all the years of streaming video on the internet, it’s that if the viewer doesn’t have a good time, it’s literally a big turn-off. If you’re going to show ads, show them well otherwise it can make for a terrible experience. Problems with ads undermine trust in an otherwise great service.

This is the topic under the spotlight in this webinar from the Streaming Video Alliance which brings together CommScope (previously ARRIS), IAB Tech Labs, Adobe and Conviva to discuss the best practices for getting ads right examining how to deliver them and ways to insert them.

Register now!

Speakers

Dave Romrell Dave Romrell
Engineering Fellow, Advance Research Group,
CommScope (previously ARRIS)
Chris Hock Chris Hock
Head of Business Strategy and Development, Media & Entertainment, Adobe
Advertising Working Group Co-Chair, Streaming Video Alliance
Sean Wilkinson Sean Wilkinson
Head of Corporate Development,
Conviva
Amit Shetty Amit Shetty
Senior Director, Video & Audio Products,
IAB
Jason Thibeault Jason Thibeault
Executive Director,
Streaming Video Alliance

Webinar: Implementing broadcaster addressable TV using HbbTV

HbbTV combines over-the-air TV with internet-delivered services which viewers see as a single, seamless service. HbbTV – which stands for Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV – is a standardised way to deliver internet-enhanced over-the-air television to homes.

Date: Tuesday 16th July, 14:00 BST / 15:00 CEST

Now on version 2.0.1, HbbTV has been adopted around the world. The UK has the Freeview Play live and on-demand service based on HbbTV 2.0, delivered over satellite. New Zealand and Australia also have a Freeview-labelled service. Turkey and Saudi Arabia have services on HbbTV and Finland has been on air sine 2013 with HbbTV.

This webinar looks at what’s new in 2.0.1 and focusses on the possibilities of targeted advertising, highlighting the RTL Group’s world first swapping over-the-air ads for internet-delivered adverts.

This webcast will discuss:

  • The benefits of a standards-based ad insertion solution for the TV and device market
  • Market penetration of HbbTV devices that support IP-into-broadcast content substitution, including free-to-air hybrid set-top boxes, smart TVs and connected TV streaming devices
  • Technology capabilities within the HbbTV 2.0.1 standard, including how to implement HbbTV-enabled addressable TV
  • The rationale for including HbbTV ad insertion on devices that already include broadcaster OTT apps
  • Compatibility and interoperability between HbbTV and the broadcast backoffice and associated ad-tech
  • Efforts to include HbbTV ad insertion in the new HbbTV-TA (Targeted Advertising) standard

Register now!

Speakers

Henry Rivero Henry Rivero
VP Advanced Advertising & Innovation,
RTL Group
Frode Hernes Frode Hernes
SVP of Product Management,
Vewd
Leon Siotis Leon Siotis
GM Revenue Europe.
SpotX
John Moulding John Moulding
Editor-in-Chief
VideoNet