Webinar: Talking to the TV: Transforming the viewing experience with voice control

Thursday 16th May 2019, 16:00 BST / 11am EDT / 8am PDT

Controlling services by voice is on the rise. Recently we have seen Google move all their Nest hardware control into Google Assistant and the abilities of Alexa and Siri continue to grow. All of these smart speakers and voice-controlled AI assistants have seen rapid adoption in homes, the UK being the biggest adopter with voice assistant devices now used in more than a quarter of all households.

With a shift away from the on-screen EPG and clunky remote controls to a world where any content is a voice command away, who owns the voice interface with the consumer and the vast amount of valuable data it creates? Does this put more power in the hands of the Silicon Valley tech giants as their voice assistants and AI algorithms become a new gatekeeper? And how should content owners respond?

This webinar explores the value of voice control for content, and finds the best strategies for broadcasters and platform operators to develop voice interfaces and maintain control of the user experience.

Register now!

Speakers

Patrick Byrden Patrick Byrden
Senior Director of Customer Solutions,
TiVo
Ashley Grossman Ashley Grossman
Senior Manager, Personalisation & Discovery,
Liberty Global
Morvarid Kashanipour Morvarid Kashanipour
Head of Product Design,
Com Hem

Video: Multicast ABR

Multicast ABR is a mix of two very beneficial technologies which are seldom seen together. ABR – Adaptive Bitrate – allows a player to change the bitrate of the video and audio that it’s playing to adapt to changing network conditions. Multicast is a network technology which efficiently sends a video stream over the network without duplicating bandwidth.

ABR has traditionally been deployed for chunk-based video like HLS where each client downloads its own copy of the video in blocks of several seconds in length. This means that you bandwidth you use to distribute your video increases by one thousand times if 1000 people play your video.

Multicast works with live streams, not chunks, but allows the bandwidth use for 1000 players to increase – in the best case – by 0%.

Here, the panelists look at the benefits of combining multicast distribution of live video with techniques to allow it to change bitrate between different quality streams.

This type of live streaming is actually backwards compatible with old-style STBs since the video sent is a live transport stream, it’s possible to deliver that to a legacy STB using a converter in the house at the same time as delivering a better, more modern delivery to other TVs and devices.

It thus also allows pure-streaming providers to compete with conventional broadcast cable providers and can also result in cost savings in equipment provided but also in bandwidth used.

There’s lots to unpack here, which is why the Streaming Video Alliance have put together this panel of experts.

Watch now and find out more!

Speakers

Phillipe Carol Phillipe Carol
Senior Product Manager,
Anevia
Neil Geary Neil Geary
Technical Strategy Consultant,
Liberty Global
Brian Stevenson Brian Stevenson
VP of Ecosystem Strategy & Partnerships,
Ericsson
Mark Fisher Mark Fisher
VP of Marketing & Business Development,
Qwilt
Jason Thibeault Jason Thibeault
Executive Director,
Streaming Video Alliance