Video: AV1 in video collaboration

AV1 is famous for its promise to deliver better compression than HEVC but also for it being far from real-time. This talk has a demonstration of the world’s first real-time AV1 video call showing that speed improvement are on the way and, indeed, some have arrived.

Encoding is split into ‘tools’ so where you might hear of ‘h.264’ or ‘MPEG 2’, these are names for a whole set of different ways of looking at – and squeezing down – a picture. They also encompass the rules of how they should act together to form a cohesive encoding mechanism. (To an extent, such codecs tend to define only how the decode should happen, leaving encoding open to innovation.) AV1 contains many tools, many of which are complex and so require a lot of time even from today’s fast computers.

Cisco’s Thomas Davies, who created the BBC’s Dirac codec which is now standardised under SMPTE’s VC-2 standard, points out that whilst these tools are complex, AV1 also has a lot of them and this diversity of choice is actually a benefit for speed and in particular for the speed of software codecs.

After demonstrating the latency and bandwidth benefits of their live, bi-directional, AV1 implementation against AVC, Thomas looks at the deployment possibilities and of AV1. The talk finishes with a summary of what AV1 brings in benefits to sum up why this new effort, with the Alliance of Open Media, is worth it.

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Speaker

Thomas Davies Thomas Davies
Principal Engineer,
Cisco Media Engineering, UK

Video: Next-Generation Video Compression Techniques

Thierry Fautier, speaking at SMPTE 2017, explains the planned advances in Codecs for the next 5 years explaining the new techniques and likely future abilities of the different codecs. Based on his technical paper, Thierry explains efforts to ‘boost’ HEVC and, in the future JVET which complements his comprehensive look across VP9, HEVC, AVC, JVET and AV1.

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Speaker


Thierry Fautier
Thierry Fautier
President-Chair at Ultra HD Forum & VP Video Strategy Harmonic

Webinar: Advanced Encoding & Transcoding with the Experts

Thursday 27th September 2018, 19:00 BST / 11am PT / 2pm ET

Encoding and transcoding are at the heart of every video service and solution, and the codec and format landscape has never been more crowded. Publishers are wringing the most efficiency out of H.264 while making the move to HEVC/H.265 and AV1—and keeping an eye on other proprietary codecs. On top of all that are considerations like video optimization, bitrate ladders, and per-title encoding.

Join this expert panel as they discuss the latest in encoding and transcoding, including the following:

  • The state of the art in encoding efficiency in 2018
  • How per-title encoding and machine learning can increase quality and decrease delivery costs
  • How to build flexible and cost-effective encoding solution
  • The latest developments in video encoding platforms and infrastructure
  • The benefits of contribution to distribution encoding and transcoding
  • The next big advances in encoding and transcoding, including AV1
MODERATOR PRESENTERS
headshot image image image
Troy Dreier
Editor
OnlineVideo.net
Richard Fliam
Solutions Architect
Bilmovin
Nick Chadwick
Software Engineer
MUX
Jiri Matela
CEO & Co-Founder
Comprimato

Video: Comparing AV1, VP9, HEVC, & H.264

Comparing AV1, VP9, HEVC and H.264 is quite a task, but Streaming Media’s Jan Ozer is here to take us through it. From MPEG royalties to VP9 browser compatibility, from the AV1 roadmap to HEVC-enabled HLS, this is a comprehensive look at real world usage of the top four codecs.

This is a key topic because many content distributors and aggregators still use H.264 as their primary, if not exclusive, codec, but the bandwidth savings promised by newer, more powerful codecs are alluring. Those considering a switch must evaluate at least three options: HEVC, VP9, and AV1.

In this session, codec specialist Jan Ozer evaluates the quality of these codecs and compares them to H.264. Learn how much bandwidth you can save with each, and how the newer codecs compare from quality and implementation perspectives.

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