Video: Delivering Better Manifests with Effective VMAF

Measuring video quality is done daily around the world between two video assets. But what happens when you want to take the aggregate quality of a whole manifest? With VMAF being a well regarded metric, how can we use that in an automatic way to get the overview we need?

In this talk, Nick Chadwick from Mux shares the examples and scripts he’s been using to analyse videos. Starting with an example where everything is equal other than quality, he explains the difficulties in choosing the ‘better’ option when the variables are much less correlated. For instance, Nick also examines the situations where a video is clearly better, but where the benefit is outweighed by the minimal quality benefit and the disproportionately high bitrate requirement.

So with all of this complexity, it feels like comparing manifests may be a complexity too far, particularly where one manifest has 5 renditions, the other only 4. The question being, how do you create an aggregate video quality metric and determine whether that missing rendition is a detriment or a benefit?

Before unveiling the final solution, Nick makes the point of looking at how people are going to be using the service. Depending on the demographic and the devices people tend to use for that service, you will find different consumption ratios for the various parts of the ABR ladder. For instance, some services may see very high usage on 2nd screens which, in this case, may take low-resolution video and also lot of ‘TV’ size renditions at 1080p50 or above with little in between. Similarly other services may seldom ever see the highest resolutions being used, percentage-wise. This shows us that it’s important not only to look at the quality of each rendition but how likely it is to be seen.

To bring these thoughts together into a coherent conclusion, Nick unveils an open-source analyser which takes into account not only the VMAF score and the resolution but also the likely viewership such that we can now start to compare, for a given service, the relative merits of different ABR ladders.

The talk ends with Nick answering questions on the tendency to see jumps between different resolutions – for instance if we over-optimise and only have two renditions, it would be easy to see the switch – how to compare videos of different resolutions and also on his example user data.

Watch now!
Speakers

Nick Chadwick Nick Chadwick
Software Engineer,
Mux

Video: What to do after per-title encoding

Per-title encoding is a common method of optimising quality and compression by changing the encoding options on a file-by-file basis. Although some would say the start of per-scene encoding is the death knell for per-title encoding, either is much better than the more traditional plan of applying exactly the same settings to each video.

This talk with Mux’s Nick Chadwick and Ben Dodson looks at what per-title encoding is and how to go about doing it. The initial work involves doing many encodes of the same video and analysing each for quality. This allows you to out which resolutions and bitrates to encode at and how to deliver the best vide.

Ben Dodson explains the way they implemented this at Mux using machine learning. This was done by getting computers to ‘watch’ videos and extract metadata. That metadata can then be used to inform the encoding parameters without the computer watching the whole of a new video.

Nick takes some time to explain MUX’s ‘convex hulls’ which give a shape to the content’s performance at different bitrates and helps visualise the optimum encoding parameters the content. Moreover we see that using this technique, we can explore how to change resolution to create the best encode. This doesn’t always mean reducing the resolution; there are some surprising circumstances when it makes sense to start at high resolutions, even for low bitrates.

The next stage after per-title encoding is to segment the video and encode each segment differently which Nick explores and explains how to deliver different resolutions throughout the stream seamlessly switching between them. Ben takes over and explains how this can be implemented and how to chose the segment boundaries correctly, again, using a machine learning approach to analysis and decision making.

Watch now!
Speakers

Nick Chadwick Nick Chadwick
Software Engineer,
Mux
Ben Dodson Ben Dodson
Data Scientist,
Mux

Video: From WebRTC to RTMP

With the demise of RTMP, what can WebRTC – its closest equivalent – learn from it? RTC stands for Real-Time Communications and hails from the video/voice teleconferencing world. RTC traditionally has ultra-low latency (think sub-second; real-time) so as broadcasters and streaming companies look to reduce latency it’s the obvious technology to look at. However, RTC comes from a background of small meetings, mixed resolutions, mixed bandwidths and so the protocols underpinning it can be lacking what broadcast-style streamers need.

Nick Chadwick from MUX looks at the pros and cons of the venerable RTMP (Real Time Messaging Protocol). What was in it that was used and unused? What did need that it didn’t have? What gap is being left by its phasing out?

Filling these increasing gaps is the focus of the streaming community and whether that comes through WebRTC, fragmented MP4 delivered over web sockets, Low-Latency HLS, Apple’s Low-Latency HLS, SASH, CMAF or something else…it still needs to be fulfilled.

Nick finishes with two demos which show the capabilities of WebRTC which outstrip RTMP – live mixing on a browser. WebRTC clearly has a future for more adventurous services which don’t simply want to deliver a linear channel to sofa-dwelling humans. But surely Nick’s message is WebRTC needs to step up to the plate for broadcasters in general to enable them to achieve <1 second end-to-end latency in a way which is compatible with broadcast workflows.

Watch now!
Speaker

Nick Chadwick Nick Chadwick
Software Engineer,
Mux

Video: Per-Title Encoding, @Scale Conference

Per-title encoding with machine learning is the topic of this video from MUX.

Nick Chadwick explains that rather than using the same set of parameters to encode every video, the smart money is to find the best balance of bitrate and resolution for each video. By analysing a large number of combinations of bitrate and resolution, Nick shows you can build what he calls a ‘convex hull’ when graphing against quality. This allows you to find the optimal settings.

Doing this en mass is difficult, and Nick spends some time looking at the different ways of implementing it. In the end, Nick and data scientist Ben Dodson built a system which optimses bitrate for each title using neural nets trained on data sets. This resulted in 84% of videos looking better using this method rather than a static ladder.

Watch now!
Speaker

Nick Chadwick Nick Chadwick
Software Engineer,
Mux