Video: ATSC 3.0 Part II – Cutting Edge OFDM with IP

RF, modulation, Single Frequency Networks (SFNs) – there’s a lot to love about this talk which is the second in a series of ATSC seminars however much is transferable to DVB. Today we’re focussed on transmission showing how ATSC 3.0 improves on DVB-T, how it simultaneously delivers feeds with different levels of robustness, the benefits of SFNs and much more.

In the second in this series of ATSC 3.0 talks, GatesAir’s Joe Seccia leads the proceedings starting by explaining why ATSC 3.0 didn’t simply adopt DVB-T2’s modulation scheme. The answer, explained in detail by Joe, is that by putting in further work, they got closer to the Shannon limit than DVB-T2 does. He continues to highlight the relevant standards which comprise the ATSC 3.0 standard which define the RF physical layer.

After showing how the different processes such as convolutional encoding and multiplexing fit together in the transmission chain, Joe focuses in on Layered Division Multiplexing (LDM) where a high robustness signal can be carefully combined with a lower robustness signal such that where one interferes with the other, there is enough separation to allow it to be decoded.

Next we are introduced to PLPs – Physical Layer Pipes. These can also be found in DVB-T2 and DVB-S2 and are logical channels carrying one or more services, with a modulation scheme and robustness particular to that individual pipe. Within those lie Frames and Subframes and Joe gives a good breakdown of the difference in meaning of the three, the Frame being at the top of the pile containing the other two. We look at how the bootstrap signal at a known modulation scheme and symbol rate details what’s coming next such which allow this very dynamic working with streams being sent with different modulation settings. The bootstrap is also important as it contains Early Alert System (EAS) signalling.

Layered Division Multiplexing is the next hot topic we hit and this elicits questions from the audience. LDM is important because it allows two streams to be sent at the same time with independent or related broadcasts. For instance this could deliver UHD content with HD underneath with the HD modulated to give much better robustness.

Another way of maintaining robustness is to establish an SFN which is now possible with ATSC 3.0. Joe explains how this is possible and how the RF from different antennae can help with reception. Importantly he also outlines how toward out the maximum separation between antennae and talks through different deployment techniques. He then works through some specific cases to understand the transmission power needed.

As the end of the video nears, Joe talks about MIMO transmission explaining how this, among other benefits, can allow channel bonding where two 6Mhz channels can be treated as a single 12Mhz channel. He talks about how PTP can complement GPS in maintaining timing if diverse systems are linked with ethernet and he then finishes with a walkthrough of configuring a system.

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Speakers

Joe Seccia Joe Seccia
Manager, TV Transmission Market and Product Development Strategy
GatesAir

Video: ASTC 3.0 Basics, Performance and the Physical Layer

ATSC 3.0 is a revolutionary technology bringing IP into the realms of RF transmission which is gaining traction in North America and is deployed in South Korea. Similar to DVB-I, ATSC 3.0 provides a way to unite the world of online streaming with that of ‘linear’ broadcast giving audiences and broadcasters the best of both worlds. Looking beyond ‘IP’, the modulation schemes are provided are much improved over ATSC 1.0 providing much better reception for the viewer and flexibility for the broadcaster.

Richard Chernock, now retired, was the CSO of Triveni Digital when he have this talk introducing the standard as part of a series of talks on the topic. ATSC, formed in 1982 brought the first wave of digital television to The States and elsewhere, explains Richard as he looks at what ATSC 1.0 delivered and what, we now see, it lacked. For instance, it’s fixed 19.2Mbps bitrate hardly provides a flexible foundation for a modern distribution platform. We then look at the previously mentioned concept that ATSC 3.0 should glue together live TV, usually via broadcast, with online VoD/streaming.

The next segment of the talk looks at how the standard breaks down into separate standards. Most modern standards like STMPE’s 2022 and 2110, are actually a suite of individual standards documents united under one name. Whilst SMPTE 2110-10, -20, -30 and -40 come together to explain how timing, video, audio and metadata work to produce the final result of professional media over IP, similarly ATSC 3.0 has sections on explaining how security, applications, the RF/physical layer and management work. Richard follows this up with a look at the protocol stack which serves to explain which parts are served on TCP, which on UDP and how the work is split between broadcast and broadband.

The last section of the talk looks at the physical layer. That is to say how the signal is broadcast over RF and the resultant performance. Richard explains the newer techniques which improve the ability to receive the signal, but highlights that – as ever – it’s a balancing act between reception and bandwidth. ATSC 3.0’s benefit is that the broadcaster gets to choose where on the scales they want to broadcast, tuning for reception indoors, for high bit-rate reception or anywhere in between. With less than -6dB SNR performance plus EAS wakeup, we’re left with the feeling that there is a large improvement over ATSC 1.0.

The talk finishes with two headlining features of ATSC 3.0. PLPs, also known as Physical Layer Pipes, are another headlining feature of ATSC 3.0, where separate channels can be created on the same RF channel. Each of these can have their own robustness vs bit rate tradeoff which allows for a range of types of services to be provided by one broadcaster. The other is Layered Division Multiplexing which allows PLPs to be transmitted on top of each other which allows 100% utilisation of the available spectrum.

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Speaker

Richard Chernock Dr. Richard Chernock
Former CSO,
Triveni Digital

Webinar: Implementing broadcaster addressable TV using HbbTV

HbbTV combines over-the-air TV with internet-delivered services which viewers see as a single, seamless service. HbbTV – which stands for Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV – is a standardised way to deliver internet-enhanced over-the-air television to homes.

Date: Tuesday 16th July, 14:00 BST / 15:00 CEST

Now on version 2.0.1, HbbTV has been adopted around the world. The UK has the Freeview Play live and on-demand service based on HbbTV 2.0, delivered over satellite. New Zealand and Australia also have a Freeview-labelled service. Turkey and Saudi Arabia have services on HbbTV and Finland has been on air sine 2013 with HbbTV.

This webinar looks at what’s new in 2.0.1 and focusses on the possibilities of targeted advertising, highlighting the RTL Group’s world first swapping over-the-air ads for internet-delivered adverts.

This webcast will discuss:

  • The benefits of a standards-based ad insertion solution for the TV and device market
  • Market penetration of HbbTV devices that support IP-into-broadcast content substitution, including free-to-air hybrid set-top boxes, smart TVs and connected TV streaming devices
  • Technology capabilities within the HbbTV 2.0.1 standard, including how to implement HbbTV-enabled addressable TV
  • The rationale for including HbbTV ad insertion on devices that already include broadcaster OTT apps
  • Compatibility and interoperability between HbbTV and the broadcast backoffice and associated ad-tech
  • Efforts to include HbbTV ad insertion in the new HbbTV-TA (Targeted Advertising) standard

Register now!

Speakers

Henry Rivero Henry Rivero
VP Advanced Advertising & Innovation,
RTL Group
Frode Hernes Frode Hernes
SVP of Product Management,
Vewd
Leon Siotis Leon Siotis
GM Revenue Europe.
SpotX
John Moulding John Moulding
Editor-in-Chief
VideoNet

Video: What causes delays in broadcast networks? Linear Vs. Live Streaming


Video: 24 minutes
A brilliant look at all the delays in broadcasting from traditional linear channels to live internet streaming. Anders Cedronius from Net Insight discusses what is acceptable and what is achievable in today’s world? Can live streaming delay match, or even beat, traditional broadcast delays?

Recorded at Streaming Tech Sweden, a Swedish conference with a dedicated focus on the technology for video streaming. Organised by Eyevinn Technology, this is the meeting place for tech managers, architects, developers and product managers looking to be educated and inspired by experts in this area, network with peers and bring home new thoughts and ideas.

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