Video: ATSC 3.0 Part IV – Advanced Emergency Alerting, AWARN & Interactive Content

In a country where the weather can be life threatenin and where earthquakes and wild fires pose a real threat to life, an Early Alert System (EAS) is very important. This talk looks at the ‘Advanced Emergency Alerting’ system (AEA) that is available in ATSC 3.0 and the coalition behind it. It also talks about some of the interactive features possible.

Richard Chernock is back to dig deeper in to the set of standards which is known as ATSC 3.0. He starts by looking at the broadcaster’s role in being a public information provider both to first responders and to the public at large. ATSC 3.0 was seen as an opportunity to go much further than EAS available in ATSC 1.0. One improvement, as covered previously, allows for very robust transmission methods. AEA also provides rich media, version information and expiry information. Additionally it can be delivered to targeted areas.

The AWARN (Advance Warning and Response Network) is a project to look world-wide at the different EAS activities ongoing in order to bring learning into ATSC and represents both broadcasters and national agencies such as FEMA and homeland security. It provides practical advice on resilience (backup generator provision), how to maximise the verboseness of information, encryption and much more.

Finishing off this short talk, Richard highlights the OTT-style interactive services possible with ATSC 3.0. He shows a quiz format where the graphics are within the control of the broadcaster. Other examples discussed are interactive access to sports replays, purchasing merchandise, the ability to synchronise with a second screen and advert displays.
Watch now!
Please note this is a 30 minute video but the version on YouTube repeats hence lasting 1.5 hours
Speakers

Richard Chernock Richard Chernock
Former CSO,
Triveni Digital

Video: ASTC 3.0 Basics, Performance and the Physical Layer

ATSC 3.0 is a revolutionary technology bringing IP into the realms of RF transmission which is gaining traction in North America and is deployed in South Korea. Similar to DVB-I, ATSC 3.0 provides a way to unite the world of online streaming with that of ‘linear’ broadcast giving audiences and broadcasters the best of both worlds. Looking beyond ‘IP’, the modulation schemes are provided are much improved over ATSC 1.0 providing much better reception for the viewer and flexibility for the broadcaster.

Richard Chernock, now retired, was the CSO of Triveni Digital when he have this talk introducing the standard as part of a series of talks on the topic. ATSC, formed in 1982 brought the first wave of digital television to The States and elsewhere, explains Richard as he looks at what ATSC 1.0 delivered and what, we now see, it lacked. For instance, it’s fixed 19.2Mbps bitrate hardly provides a flexible foundation for a modern distribution platform. We then look at the previously mentioned concept that ATSC 3.0 should glue together live TV, usually via broadcast, with online VoD/streaming.

The next segment of the talk looks at how the standard breaks down into separate standards. Most modern standards like STMPE’s 2022 and 2110, are actually a suite of individual standards documents united under one name. Whilst SMPTE 2110-10, -20, -30 and -40 come together to explain how timing, video, audio and metadata work to produce the final result of professional media over IP, similarly ATSC 3.0 has sections on explaining how security, applications, the RF/physical layer and management work. Richard follows this up with a look at the protocol stack which serves to explain which parts are served on TCP, which on UDP and how the work is split between broadcast and broadband.

The last section of the talk looks at the physical layer. That is to say how the signal is broadcast over RF and the resultant performance. Richard explains the newer techniques which improve the ability to receive the signal, but highlights that – as ever – it’s a balancing act between reception and bandwidth. ATSC 3.0’s benefit is that the broadcaster gets to choose where on the scales they want to broadcast, tuning for reception indoors, for high bit-rate reception or anywhere in between. With less than -6dB SNR performance plus EAS wakeup, we’re left with the feeling that there is a large improvement over ATSC 1.0.

The talk finishes with two headlining features of ATSC 3.0. PLPs, also known as Physical Layer Pipes, are another headlining feature of ATSC 3.0, where separate channels can be created on the same RF channel. Each of these can have their own robustness vs bit rate tradeoff which allows for a range of types of services to be provided by one broadcaster. The other is Layered Division Multiplexing which allows PLPs to be transmitted on top of each other which allows 100% utilisation of the available spectrum.

Watch now!
Speaker

Richard Chernock Dr. Richard Chernock
Former CSO,
Triveni Digital

Video: Everything You Wanted to Know About ATSC 3.0

ATSC 3.0 is the next sea change in North American broadcasting, shared with South Korea, Mexico and other locations. Depending on your viewpoint, this could be as fundamental as the move to digital lockstep with the move to HD programming all those years ago.

ATSC 3.0 takes terrestrial broadcasting in to the IP world meaning everything transmitted over the air is done over IP and it brings with it the ability to split the bandwidth into separate pipes.

Here, Dr. Richard Chernock presents a detailed description of the available features within ATSC. He explains the new constellations and modulation properties delving into the ability to split your transmission bandwidth into separate ‘pipes’. These pipes can have different modulation parameters, robustness etc. The switch from 8VSB to OFDM allows for Single Frequency Networks which can actually help reception (due to guard intervals).

Additionally, the standard supports HEVC and scalable video (SHVC) whereby a single UHD encode can be sent which has an HD base-layer which can be decoded by every decoder plus an ‘enhancement layer’ which can be optionally decoded to produce a full UHD output for those decoders/displays which an support it.

With the move to IP, there is a blurring of broadcast and broadband. This can be used to deliver extra audios via broadband to be played with the main video and can be used as a return path to the broadcaster which can help with interactivity and audience measurement.

Dr. Chernock covers HDR, better pixels and Next Generation Audio as well as Emergency Alerts functionality improvements and accessibility features.

Speaker

Dr. Richard Chernock Dr. Richard Chernock
Chief Science Officer,
Triveni Digital

Video: Power Talks – ATSC 3.0

ATSC 3.0 is the major next step in broadcasting for the US, South Korea and other countries and is a major update to the ATSC standard in so many way that getting across it all is not trivial. All terrestrial broadcasting in the US are done with ATSC as opposed to many other places, including Europe, which use DVB.

ATSC 3.0 brings in OFDM modulation which is a tried and tested technology also used in DVB. But the biggest change in the standard is that all of the transport within ATSC is IP. Broadcasters now, using broadband as a return path, have two-way communication with their viewers allowing transfer of data as well as media.

In this talk from Imagine Communications, we talk a look into the standard which, as is common nowadays, is a suite of standards. These standards cover Early Alerts, immersive audio, DRM, return paths and more. We then have a look at the system architecture of the ATSC 3.0 broadcast deployed in Phoenix.

South Korea has been pushing forward ATSC 3.0 and Chet Dagit looks at what they have been doing and how they’ve created high quality UHD channels to the consumer. He then looks at what the US can learn from this work but also DVB deployments in Europe.

Finally, Yuval Fisher looks at how the data and granularity available in ATSC 3.0 allows for more targeted ads and how you would manage both internally and harnessing it for ad campaigns.

Watch now!

Speakers

Steve Reynolds Steve Reynolds
President, P & N Solutions,
Imagine Communications
Mark Corl Mark Corl
SVP of Emergent Technology,
Triveni Digital
Chet Dagit Chet Dagit
Founder & Managing Member
RTP Holdings-Lokita Solutions
Yuval Fisher Yuval Fisher
CTO, Distribution
Imagine Communications