Video: AES67/ST 2110-30 over WAN

Dealing with professional audio, it’s difficult to escape AES67 particularly as it’s embedded within the SMPTE ST 2110-30 standard. Now, with remote workflows prevalent, moving AES67 over the internet/WAN is needed more and more. This talk brings the good news that it’s certainly possible, but not without some challenges.

Speaking at the SMPTE technical conference, Nicolas Sturmel from Merging Technologies outlines the work being done within the AES SC-02-12M working group to define the best ways of working to enable easy use of AES67 on the WAn. He starts by outlining the fact that AES67 was written to expect short links on a private network that you can completely control which causes problems when using the WAN/internet with long-distance links on which your bandwidth or choice of protocols can be limited.

To start with, Nicolas urges anyone to check they actually need AES67 over the WAN to start with. Only if you need precise timing (for lip sync for example) with PCM quality and low latencies from 250ms down to as a little as 5 milliseconds do you really need AES67 instead of using other protocols such as ACIP, he explains. The problem being that any ping on the internet, even to something fairly close, can easily take 16 to 40ms for the round trip. This means you’re guaranteed 8ms of delay, but any one packet could be as late as 20ms known as the Packet Delay Variation (PDV).

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Not only do we need to find a way to transmit AES67, but also PTP. The Precise Time Protocol has ways of coping for jitter and delay, but these don’t work well on WAN links whether the delay in one direction may be different to the delay for a packet in the other direction. PTP also isn’t built to deal with the higher delay and jitter involved. PTP over WAN can be done and is a way to deliver a service but using a GPS receiver at each location is a much better solution only hampered by cost and one’s ability to see enough of the sky.

The internet can lose packets. Given a few hours, the internet will nearly always lose packets. To get around this problem, Nicolas looks at using FEC whereby you are constantly sending redundant data. FEC can send up to around 25% extra data so that if any is lost, the extra information sent can be leveraged to determine the lost values and reconstruct the stream. Whilst this is a solid approach, computing the FEC adds delay and the extra data being constantly sent adds a fixed uplift on your bandwidth need. For circuits that have very few issues, this can seem wasteful but having a fixed percentage can also be advantageous for circuits where a predictable bitrate is much more important. Nicolas also highlights that RIST, SRT or ST 2022-7 are other methods that can also work well. He talks about these longer in his talk with Andreas Hildrebrand

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Speakers

Nicolas Sturmel Nicolas Sturmel
Product Manager, Senior Technologist,
Merging Technologies

Video: RAVENNA AM824 & SMPTE ST 2110-31 Applications



Audio has a long heritage in IP compared to video, so there’s plenty of overlap and there are edge cases abound when working between RAVENNA, AES67 and SMPTE ST 2110-30 and -31. SMPTE’s 2110 suite of standards currently holds two methods of carrying audio including a way of carrying encoded audio such as Dolby AC4 and Dolby E.

RAVENNA Evangelist Andreas Hildebrand is joined by Dolby Labs architect James Cowdrey to discuss the compatibility of -30 and -31 with AES67 and how non-PCM data can be carried in -31 whether that be lightly compressed audio, object audio for immersive experiences or even just pure metadata.

Andreas starts by revising the key differences between AES67 and RAVENNA. The core of AES67 fits neatly within RAVENNA’s capabilities including the transport of up to 24-bit linear PCM with 48 samples per packet and up to 8 channels of 48kHz audio. RAVENNA offers more sample rates, more channels and adds discovery and redundancy with modes such as ‘MADI’ and ‘High performance’ which help constrain and select the relevant parameters.

SMPTE ST 2110-30 is based on AES67 but adds its own constraints such that any -30 stream can be received by an AES67 decoder, however, an AES67 sender needs to be aware of -30’s constraints for it to be correctly decoded by a -30 receiver. Andreas says that all AES67 senders now have this capability.


In contrast to 2110-30, 2110-31 is all about AES3 and the ability of AES3 to carry both linear PCM and non-PCM data. We look at the structure of the AES3 which contains audio blocks each of which has 192 Frames. These frames are split into 2, in the case of stereo, 64 in the case of MADI. Within each of these subframes, we finally find the preamble and the 24-bit data. Andreas explains how this is linked to AM824 and the SDP details needed.

James Cowdery leads the second part of today’s talk first talking about SMPTE ST 337 which details how to send non-PCM audio and data in an AES3 serial digital audio interface. It can carry AC-3, AC-4 for object audio delivering immersive audio experiences, Dolby E and also the metadata standards KLV and Serial ADM.

‘Why use Dolby E?’ asks James. Dolby E has a number of advantages although as bandwidth has become more available, it is increasingly replaced by uncompressed audio. However legacy workflows may now be reliant on IP infrastructure between the receiver and decoder, so it’s important to be able to carry it. Dolby E also packs a whole set of surround sound within a single data stream removing any problems of relative phase and can be carried over MPEG-2 transport streams so it still has plenty of flexibility and uses cases.

Its strength can bring fragility and one way which you can destroy a Dolby E feed is by switching between two videos containing Dolby E in the middle of the data rather than waiting for the gap between packets which is called the guardband. Dolby E needs to be aligned to the video so that you can crossfade and switch between videos without breaking the audio. James makes the point that one reason to use -31 and not -30 to carry Dolby E, or any other non-PCM data, is that -30 assumes that a sample rate converter can be used and so there is usually little control over when an SRC is brought in to use. A sample rate converter, of course, would destroy any non-PCM data.

RAVENNA 824 and 2110-31 gateways will preserver the line position of Dolby data. Can support Dolby E transport can therefore be supported by a vendor without Dolby support. James notes that your Dolby E packets need to be 125 microseconds to achieve packet-level switching without missing a guardband and corrupting data.

Immersive audio requires metadata. sADM is an open specification for metadata interchange, the aim of which is to help interoperability between vendors. sADM metadata can be embedded in SDI, transported uncompressed as SMPTE 302 in MPEG-2 Transport Streams and for 2110, is carried in -31. It’s based on XML description of metadata from the Audio Definition Model and James advises using the GZip compression mode to reduce the bitrate as it can be sent per-frame. An alternative metadata standard is SMPTE ST 336 which is an open format providing a binary payload which makes it a lower-latency method for sending Metadata. These methods of sending metadata made sense in the past, but now, with SMPTE ST 2110 having its own section for metadata essences, we see 2110-41 taking shape to allow data like this to be carried on its own.

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Speakers

James Cowdery James Cowdery
Senior Staff Architect
Dolby Laboratories
Andreas Hildebrand Andreas Hildebrand
RAVENNA Evangelist,
ALC NetworX

Video: Introduction to IPMX

The Broadcast Knowledge has documented over 100 videos and webinars on SMPTE ST 2110. It’s a great suite of standards but it’s not always simple to implement. For smaller systems, many of the complications and nuances don’t occur so a lot of the deeper dives into ST 2110 and its associated specifications such as NMOS from AMWA focus on the work done in large systems in tier-1 broadcasters such as the BBC, tpc and FIS Skiing for SVT.

ProAV, the professional end of the AV market, is a different market. Very few companies have a large AV department if one at all. So the ProAV market needs technologies which are much more ‘plug and play’ particularly those in the events side of the market. To date, the ProAV market has been successful in adopting IP technology with quick deployments by using heavily proprietary solutions like ZeeVee, SDVoE and NDI to name a few. These achieve interoperability by having the same software or hardware in each and every implementation.

IPMX aims to change this by bringing together a mix of standards and open specifications: SMPTE ST 2110, NMOS specs and AES. Any individual or company can gain access and develop a service or product to meet them.

Andreas gives a brief history of IP to date outlining how AES67, ST 2110, ST 2059 and the IS specifications, his point being that the work is not yet done. ProAV has needs beyond, though complementary to, those of broadcast.

AES67 is already the answer to a previous interoperability challenge, explains Andreas, as the world of audio over IP was once a purely federated world of proprietary standards which had no, or limited, interoperability. AES67 defined a way to allow these standards to interoperate and has now become the main way audio is moved in SMPTE 2110 under ST 2110-30 (2110-31 allows for AES3). Andreas explains the basics of 2110, AES, as well as the NMOS specifications. He then shows how they fit together in a layered design.

Andreas brings the talk to a close looking at some of the extensions that are needed, he highlights the ability to be more flexible with the quality-bandwidth-latency trade-off. Some ProAV applications require pixel perfection, but some are dictated by lower bandwidth. The current ecosystem, if you include ST 2110-22’s ability to carry JPEG-XS instead of uncompressed video allows only very coarse control of this. HDMI, naturally, is of great importance for ProAV with so many HDMI interfaces in play but also the wide variety of resolutions and framerates that are found outside of broadcast. Work is ongoing to enable HDCP to be carried, suitably encrypted, in these systems. Finally, there is a plan to specify a way to reduce the highly strict PTP requirements.

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Speaker

Andreas Hildebrand Andreas Hildebrand
Evangelist,
ALC NetworX

Video: AES67 & SMPTE ST 2110 Timing and Synchronization

Good timing is essential in production for AES67 audio and SMPTE ST 2110. Delivering timing is no longer a matter of delivering a signal throughout your facility, over IP timing is bidirectional and forms a system which should be monitored and managed. Timing distribution has always needed design and architecture, but the detail and understanding needed are much more. At the beginning of this talk, Andreas Hildebrand explains why we need to bother with such complexity, after all, we got along very well for many years without it! Non-IP timing signals are distributed on their own cables as part of their own system. There are some parts of the chain which can get away without timing signals, but when they are needed, they are on a separate cable. With IP, having a separate network for distribution of timing doesn’t make sense so, whether you have an analogue or digital timing signal, that needs to be moving into the IP domain. But how much accuracy in timing to you need? Network devices already widely use NTP which can achieve an accuracy of less than a millisecond. Andreas explains that this isn’t enough for professional audio. At 48Khz, AES samples happen at an accuracy of plus or minus 10 microseconds with 192KHz going down to 2.5 microseconds. As your timing signal has to be less than the accuracy you need, this means we need to achieve nanosecond precision.

Daniel Boldt from timing specialists Meinberg is the focus of this talk explaining how we achieve this nano-second precision. Enter PTP, the Precision Time Protocol. This is a cross-industry standard from the IEEE uses in telcoms, power, finance and in many others wherever a network and its devices need to understand the time. It’s not a static standard, Daniel explains, and it’s just about to see its third revision which, like the last, adds features.

Before finding out about the latest changes, Daniel explains how PTP works in the first place; how is it possible to accurately derive time down to the nanosecond over a network which will have variable propagation times? We see how timestamps are introduced into the network interface controller (NIC) at the last moment allowing the timestamps to be created in hardware which removes some of the variable delays that is typical in software. This happens, Daniel shows, in the switch as well as in the server network cards. This article will refer to either a primary clock or a grand master. Daniel steps us through the messages exchanged between the primary and secondary clock which is the interaction at the heart of the protocol. The key is that after the primary has sent a timestamp, the secondary sends its timestamp to the primary which replies saying the time it received the secondary the reply. The secondary ends up with 4 timestamps that it can combine to determine its offset from the primary’s time and the delay in receiving messages. Applying this information allows it to correct the clock very accurately.

PTP Primary-Secondary Message Exchange.
Source: Meinberg

Most broadcasters would prefer to have more than one grandmaster clock but if there are multiple clocks, how do you choose which to sync from? Timing systems have long used strata whereby clocks are rated based on accuracy, either for internal accuracy & stability or by what they are synched to. This is also true for PTP and is part of the considerations in the ‘Best Master Clock Algorithm’. The BMCA starts by allowing a time source to assess its own accuracy and then search for better options on the network. Clocks announce themselves to the network and by listening to other announcements, a clock can decide if it should become a primary clock if, for instance, it hears no announce messages at all. For devices which should never be a grand primary, you can force them never to decide to become grand masters. This is a requisite for audio devices participating in ST 2110-3x.

Passing PTP around the network takes some care and is most easily done by using switches which understand PTP. These switches either run a ‘boundary clock’ or are ‘transparent clocks’. Daniel explores both of these scenarios explaining how the boundary clock switch is able to run multiple primary and secondary clocks depending on what is connected on each interface. We also see what work the switches have to do behind the scenes to maintain timing precision in transparent mode. In summary, Daniel summaries boundary clocks as being good for hierarchical systems and scales well but requires continuous monitoring whereas transparent clocks are simpler to deploy and require minimal monitoring. The main issue with transparent clocks is that they don’t scale well as all your timing messages are still going back to one main clock which could get overwhelmed.

SMPTE 2022-7 has been a very successful standard as its reliance only on RTP has allowed it to be widely applicable to compressed and uncompressed IP flows. It is often used in 2110 networks, too, where two separate networks are run and brought together at the receiving device. That device, on a packet-by-packet basis, is free to derive its audio/video stream from either network. This requires, however, exactly the same timing on both networks so Daniel looks at an example diagram where this PTP sharing is shown.

PTP’s still evolving and in this next section, Daniel takes us through some of the coming improvements which are also outlined at Meinberg’s blog. These are profile isolation, multi-domain clocks, security improvements and more.

Andreas takes the final section of the webinar to explain how we use PTP in media networks. All receivers will have the same clock which could be derived from GPS removing the need to distribute PTP between sites. 2110 is based on RTP which requires a timestamp to be added to every packet delivered to the network. RTP is a wrapper around IP packets which includes a timestamp which can be derived from the media clock counter.

Andreas looks at how accurate RTP delivery is achieved, dealing with offset values, populating the timestamp from the PTP clock for realties streams and he explains how the playout delay is calculated from the link offset. Finally, he shows the relatively simple process of synchronisation art the playout device. With all the timestamps in the system, synchronising playback of audio, video and metadata using buffers can be achieved fairly easily. Unfortunately, timestamps are easily destroyed by secondary processing (for instance loudness adjustment for an audio stream). Clearly, if this happened, synchronisation at the receiver would be broken. Whilst this will be addressed by out-of-band messaging in future standards, for now, this is managed by a broadcast controller which can take delay information from processing stages and distribute this to receivers.

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Speakers

Daniel Boldt Daniel Boldt
Head of Software Development,
Meinberg
Andreas Hildebrand Andreas Hildebrand
RAVENNA Technology Evangelist,
ALC NetworX