Video: Visual Excellence in Production

In this Tech Talk we shall hear from researchers and vision scientists, how they are ensuring the precision of HDR and colour in image capture.

Today’s imaging technology strives to produce a viewing experience which is, as far as possible, identical with that perceived by the human visual system. Strangely, one limiting factor in high dynamic range (HDR) design has been that existing measurements of the human vision have not been sufficiently accurate. Another of these issues is skin tone: humans are particularly sensitive to skin colour – regarding it as an indicator of well-being. The accurate portrayal of this subtle parameter is therefore particularly important. A further interesting image quality issue is slow motion – here we explore the development of an 8K UHD 240fps camera and slow motion capture and replay server.

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Speakers

Lucien Lenzen Lucien Lenzen
Research Assistant
Hochschule RheinMain
Simon Thompson Simon Thompson
Project R&D Engineer
BBC
Patrick Morvan Patrick Morvan
Senior R&D Engineer
Technicolor
Simon Gauntlett Simon Gauntlett
Director of Imaging Standards and Technology
Dolby Laboratories

Video: An overview on 10-bit video — UHD, HDR and Coding Efficiency

In the past few years, the industry has been trying to improve the end user experience to have a higher spatial (pixels), temporal (framerate) and spectral (bitdepth) resolution.

This talk from Vimeo’s Vittorio Giovara and Ronald Bultje from Two Orioles will explore the high-bitdepth element of this improved user experience. Technically, this is usually referred to as 10-bit video, since, historically, the video user experience has been largely based on a 8-bit world. We will explain marketing terms like HDR, UHDTV, explore high bitdepth-support in commonly used video coding software, and showcase how these work together to improve your video coding efficiency and end user experience.

Introduction: Josie Keller (JWPlayer)
Presenters: Vittorio Giovara (Vimeo), Ronald Bultje (Two Orioles)

Video: Tomorrow is Always a Day Away


A fantastic look at the history of all the modern technologies looking at how they were conceived and where we are today. Mark Schubin deftly covers:

  • HD, VR, 3D, AI, HDR, HFR
  • ‘Direct View’ Cinema Screens
  • How HDR, HFR interact
  • The move to IP
  • IMF and a look at the future

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Webinar: UHD & HDR

Today at 14:00 GMT! 8th March
This Webinar covers Ultra-High Definition (UHD) Television and related technologies such as Higher Dynamic Range (HDR), Higher Frame Rates (HFR) and Next Generation Audio (NGA) in distribution.

What is the impact of Higher Frame Rates? What about Higher Dynamic Range? The German Institut für Rundfunktechnik (IRT) was involved in various subjective tests for HDR and HFR, and the IRT’s Dagmar Driesnack will cover those findings in her presentation.

Both features are also included in the latest DVB (Digital Video Broadcasting) receiver specification. Virginie Drugeon will present on DVB’s updated audio-visual coding specification, TS 101 154, which adds support for HDR, HFR and Next-Gen Audio.

Webinar Agenda

  1. Introduction
  2. UHD Features and Tests – Dagmar Driesnack
  3. Q&A
  4. UHD in DVB Distribution Standards – Virginie Drugeon
  5. Q&A
  6. What is next? – Interactive session with Dagmar Driesnack and Virginie Drugeon

Presenters

Dagmar_Driesnack_100x100.jpgDagmar Driesnack, IRT, EBU Strategic Programme for Video Systems Co-Chair

 

Virginie_Drugeon_100x100.jpgVirginie Drugeon, Panasonic, DVB TM-AVC Working Group Chair

 

Video: Understanding Frame Rate by Mark Schubin


We all need this occasionally – a reminder of the fundementals of watching video. Mark Schubin talks us through framerates from the earliest days of the motion picture industry when scientists, engineers and filmmakers collaborated on advancing the technologies that make motion pictures the most dynamic of art forms. Frame rates and colour space require common standards for industry-wide adoption.

Recorded at SMPTE Toronto, we see how in viewing tests, increased frame rate delivers a greater sensation of improvement than increased resolution (at a fraction of the increase in data rate), but some viewers of the higher-frame-rate Hobbit found the sensation unpleasant.

How does frames-per-second translate into pixels-per-screen-width? One common frame rate is based on profit; another is based on an interpretation of Asian spirituality.
Will future frame rates have to take image contrast into consideration? We are all involved with some part of the colour science pipeline as it spans filming to final display, and all the complex steps in between. In the last several years the subject of color management has become a colossal issue in the visual effects community. Modern media projects get content from a wide variety of sources. So how do we get all of this content to play nice together in a production environment?

@SMPTETor
@schubincafe

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On-Demand: DVB UHD HDR Webinar


On-Demand Webinar

DVB recently updated its audio-visual coding specification, adding support for High Dynamic Range (HDR), Higher Frame Rates (HFR) and Next Generation Audio (NGA). You can now learn all about the new features in a webinar by the editor of this impressive specification, Virginie Drugeon (Panasonic) on January 18th, 2017. The webinar and Q&A time should take around 1 hour. You can send your questions by the Webex chat function during the webinar and questions will be answered in a few blocks during the webinar.

The specification update has been published as BlueBook A157 and will be passed to ETSI for formal publication as TS 101 154 v2.3.1.

High Dynamic Range (HDR) significantly increases the contrast ratio and results in pictures with more ‘sparkle’. The DVB HDR solution supports Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) and Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) transfer functions. Furthermore, the new specification defines Higher Frame Rates (HFR), offering sharper images of moving objects by going beyond the current 50/60 frames per second. When it comes to audio, DVB has added the latest Next Generation Audio (NGA) schemes to provide immersive and personalized audio content using object- or scene-based coding.

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